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LT  William CARRILLO

UNIT: 350th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: BOM

Lt William "RED" Carrillo, BOM on Lt Williamson Crew. Shadowbox with medals. Photo courtesy of Son Kirk Carrillo

SERIAL #: O-757695 STATUS: POW
MACR: 05167 CR: 05167

Comments1: 24 MAY 44 BERLIN (CREW 50 PL 31941) "RED"

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW

2ND LT LT LINDLEY L. WILLIAMSON                P POW   24 MAY 44 BERLIN
2ND LT JAMES G. DENNIS                             CP KIA   24 MAY 44 BERLIN
2ND LT BARWICK O. BARFIELD                     NAV POW 24 MAY 44 BERLIN (see DAYS NOT FORGOTTEN in 100th files)
2ND LT WILLIAM "RED" CARRILLO                 BOM POW 24 MAY 44 BERLIN
S/SGT LLOYD K. KOUNS                              ROG KIA   24 MAY 44 BERLIN
S/SGT A.L. SULLIVAN                                  WG NOC
SGT JAMES O. TOWNSEND, JR.                    BTG POW 24 MAY 44 BERLIN
SGT JACK E. MARSHALL                              WG NOC
SGT CHARLES B. SEWELL                           TTE POW 24 MAY 44 BERLIN TAPS:25 FEB 1991
SGT ROBERT H. ANDERSON                         TG POW 24 MAY 44 BERLIN

350TH SQDN.. CREW, AS ABOVE, JOINED THE 100TH ON 17 MAR 1944

ON A COMBAT CREW ROSTER OF 7 MAY 44 AND ON THE FINAL MISSION,  S/SGT WIENIEWSKI, AND S/SGT  COLBERT GRAHAM (from the crew of  LT JOHN LAUTENSCHLAGER) WERE ON THE CREW ON PLACE OF SULLIVAN & MARSHALL AND BOTH BECAME POWs. THIS WAS THE 13TH MISSION FOR THIS CREW.

ACCORDING TO STATEMENTS IN THE MACR, LT WILLIAMSON BELIEVED BOTH LT DENNIS AND SGT KOUNS WERE KILLED BY GERMAN CIVILIANS. GERMAN RECORDS INDICATE KOUNS DEAD AND RECOVERED AT CRASH  AND BURIED IN VILLAGE CEMENTARY KAMPEHL; GRAVE #1 ON 24 MAY 1944. OF DENNIS THE GERMAN REPORT STATES: "BURIED AT THE LOCAL CEMENTARY OF SEGELETZ, DISTRICT RUPPIN ON 24 MAY 1944 AT GRAVE #1 AT THE ELDER BUSH." THIS REPORTS SMACKS OF A COVERUP AND  IT IS LIKELY CIVILIANS KILLED THESE AIRMEN BEFORE THEY CAME UNDER GERMAN MILITARY CONTROL. THERE ARE ALL TO MANY SUCH REPORTS…pw


SEE DAYS NOT FORGOTTEN  BY MARILEE WILSHIRE BARFIELD IN THE 100TH FILES. THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST REASEARCHED AND WELL WRITTEN WORKS DEALING WITH POW LIFE AND THE EFFECT ON FAMILY AND LOVED ONES IN THE USA. IT INCLUDES GERMAN INTERROGATION REPORTS, AMERICAN INTERROGATION REPORTS TAKEN AT CAMP LUCKY STRIKE IN 1945, RED CROSS POW BULLETINS, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES,  PERSONAL LETTERS FROM LT BARFIELD AND ALL OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS ISSUED BY THE WAR DEPARTMENT AND U.S ARMY AIR FORCE REGARDING LT BARFIELD.

THERE IS A DETAILED ACCOUNT OF THE EVENTS CAUSING THE LOSS OF THE AIRCRAFT AND INFORMATION CONCERNING THE FATE OF THE ENTIRE CREW..
 
         MISSIONS OF 2ND LT BARWICK O. BARFIELD (mpf 2001)

1. 28/03/44 CHATEAUDUN, FR
      31/03/44 LUDWIGSHAFEN (SCRUBBED)
      01/04/44 LUDWIGSHAFEN (RECALL)
      07/04/44 QUAKENBRUCK (SCRUBBED)
2. 08/04/44 QUACKENBRUCK, GER
3. 10/04/44 MALDEGEM, FR
4. 13/04/44 AUGSBURG, GER
5. 18/04/44 BERLIN
6. 07/05/44 BERLIN
7. 08/05/44 BERLIN
8. 09/05/44 ATHIES, FR
9. 11/05/44 LIEGE, BELGIUM
10. 19/05/44 BERLIN
11. 20/05/44 BRUSSELS, BELGIUM
12. 23/05/44 TROYES, FR
12. 24/05/44 BERLIN

*************************************************************************************************************

FYI, Red's story in the SF Chronicle last year.

Jack
----------------------------------------------------------------------
This article was sent to you by someone who found it on SFGate.
The original article can be found on SFGate.com here:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/11/11/MN3CT8RU1.DTL
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
Sunday, November 11, 2007 (SF Chronicle)
Veterans Day is a time for forgotten Latinos to be recognized
Tyche Hendricks, Chronicle Staff Writer


   William Carrillo had just started ninth grade at San Francisco's High
School of Commerce in 1933 when he was forced to leave. "The principal
decided I was Mexican. … He threw me out," said Carrillo, now 88 and a
decorated World War II veteran.
   When the California-born Carrillo came home from the war an Army Air Corps
captain in 1945, the same principal caught sight of him in uniform one day
and began talking fondly of his former student to a group of San Francisco
teachers.
   Carrillo would have none of it. After risking his life for his country and
enduring torture and 11 months of near-starvation in a Nazi prisoner of
war camp, Carrillo felt he had earned the right to speak up for himself.
   "I said, 'You threw me out of Commerce High School and now I've
got these
wings on, you're kissing up to me.' "
   Carrillo, a resident of Daly City, served as a bombardier in the 350th
Squadron of the 100th Bomb Group of the Army Air Corps, the precursor of
the U.S. Air Force. From a base in England, he flew dozens of missions
over France and Germany, and was shot down over Berlin in May 1944.
   Like millions of World War II veterans, he made it home battered but
triumphant to resume his civilian life. Those soldiers, along with all
veterans of U.S. military service, are honored today, Veterans Day.
   But Carrillo's story, and those of an estimated half million Latino
veterans of World War II, has not always been given the country's full
attention.
   Hispanic soldiers served with distinction, earning more Medals of Honor
and other decorations in proportion to their numbers than any other ethnic
group, according to Maggie Rivas-Rodríguez, director of the U.S. Latino &
Latina WWII Oral History Project at the University of Texas.
   Many Latino servicemen, including Carrillo, were treated with a new level
of respect in the military, but upon returning home, they, like African
American Gis, found that segregation and bigotry were still in place in
the United States.
   Their stories briefly came to public attention earlier this year when
Latino leaders criticized documentary filmmaker Ken Burns for omitting
Latino voices from his epic PBS documentary, "The War." Burns
insisted he should not be expected to provide a comprehensive version of history, but
in response to the outcry he did add half an hour to his 14-hour
miniseries, including two Latinos and one American Indian veteran. Critics
called it tacked-on and inadequate, and said everyone's view of history
was skewed when one group was omitted.
   "If people think Latinos do not have a role in the history of this
country, then they can be easily dismissed as deserving of respect or
rights," said East Bay resident Armando Rendón, who joined
Rivas-Rodríguez
and others last spring in starting a "Defend the Honor" campaign to
push
Burns for Latino inclusion. "In World War II, we as a people responded to
the responsibility of being Americans. … (But) people see us as the
eternal immigrant or bracero, rather than being seen as contributors
deserving of recognition."
   In an effort to set the record straight, Rivas-Rodríguez began collecting
oral histories from Hispanic veterans in 1999, and so far has documented
the experiences of 620 Latinos who served in the military or on the home
front during the war. Rivas-Rodríguez learned of Francisco Alvarado, who
was born in Texas but was removed to Mexico during mass deportations in
the 1930s. When a draft notice was sent to his old Texas address in 1941
and then forwarded to him in Mexico, he returned home to serve his
country, and was taken prisoner in Normandy. Ten of his 12 children
followed him into the U.S. military, she said.
   Another serviceman, Armando Flores, had roots in Texas dating back to the
1700s. One winter day after enlisting, he was standing around on a frigid
Army base with his hands in his pockets when an officer barked that
American soldiers stand at attention, not with their hands in their
pockets. What struck Flores was not the dressing-down, he recounted in his
oral history, but the fact that, after years of being called a spic, a
greaser and a wetback, for the first time in his life, he had been called
an American.
   Like Burns, Rivas-Rodríguez has felt she is in a race against time to
record the stories of these octogenarian veterans before they die.
   "It's important for us, Latino and non-Latino, to understand what
the
challenges were, and the incredible exertions of these people," she said.
"I want my own sons to know what kind of people they come from. These were
not people who gave up easily."
   Carrillo's story was included in the oral history project. The son of a
Spaniard and a Mexican, he endured second-class treatment growing up
despite his red hair, white skin and unaccented English.
   "In those days there was no such thing as Latinos," he said.
"We were
known as stupid Mexicans."
   But he didn't let the prejudices of others hold him down.
   Carrillo wanted to become a pilot, so despite the skepticism of his
examiners, he applied for the Air Corps cadet program. He passed the
physical and aptitude tests but he lacked the required college degree, so
he wrote on his application that he was a graduate of the College of Hard
Knox. By the time military officials noticed, Carrillo was being inducted,
a trained bomber pilot they couldn't afford to lose. ("It was the best
college in the world," he told them unapologetically.)
   Carrillo's nerve was steeled flying through German anti-aircraft flak
and
enduring beatings at the hands of the Gestapo. After the war, he returned
to his job as a janitor at San Francisco's MJB Coffee Co., where owner
Edward Bransten told him it was a shame he didn't have more education, so
he could move up in the company.
   "Mister Edward," said Carrillo looking up from his mop, "I
became an
officer in the Air Corps, so I think I can probably do any goddamn job you
give me." The next week he was promoted to a position in the roasting and
grinding department. He retired from the coffee company five decades later
after rising to manager of the production plant.
   Just as the war was a turning point in Carrillo's life, it emboldened
countless other Latinos to speak up for fair treatment, and gave momentum
to a nascent civil rights movement among Latinos as it did with African
Americans.
   Two of the groups founded by Hispanic World War II veterans, the American
GI Forum and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, worked
for years to end discriminatory poll taxes and all-white juries, and to
eliminate segregation in schools and other public places.
   Many Latino vets were educated on the GI Bill. Others built careers
working for social change, including Los Angeles Rep. Edward Roybal and
United Farm Workers founder Cesar Chavez.
   "Having fought in the war, they established their patriotism. Their
loyalty was no longer in question," said UC Berkeley historian David
Montejano. "This was a major event in terms of beginning to change ethnic
relations."
   Bay Area veteran Carlos Jaime of Vallejo remembers "whites only"
signs on bars and barbershops in his hometown of Kansas City, Kan. After risking
his life in the Battle of the Bulge, the bloody German counteroffensive at
the end of World War II, Jaime was ready to take on injustice in the
United States.
   "We put our lives on the line to make a better life for everybody, so
we said, 'Let's exercise it. Let's ask for our rights,' " he
recalled. "I got into city politics for a while to make a better place for our kids."

   For Carrillo, the year he spent in Stalag Luft 3, the POW camp where he
lost 100 pounds subsisting on slivers of pumpernickel and worm-infested
soup, also forged a personal resilience that made lesser hardships
bearable. Even the fact that the Army lost his records in a fire and never
paid him for his last 16 months of service didn't embitter him.

   "We had a sign up in the POW camp: 'I used to cry because I had no
shoes,until I saw a man who had no feet,' " said Carrillo, who's still
helping his children drywall their house and cooking dinner for his wife. "I
don't worry about anything anymore. I'm healthy and I've got my family."
Online resources For Information on the U.S. Latino and Latina World War II Oral
History Project, go to

*******************************************************************************************************************

                                 Wings over Berlin: 
                      The Story of Captain William Carrillo
                            
                         http://www.somosenescrito.com

As we were preparing this history of William Carrillo for publication, we learned from the author that Captain Carrillo died on Saturday, June 20, 2015, in Daly City, California, at the age of 96. This becomes, therefore, a memorial to his service and his life.

By Mario Barrera

William Carrillo was as shocked as other Americans when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in December 1941, catapulting the United States into World War II. In February 1942, he enlisted in the Army and asked to be assigned to the Army Air Corps, shortly to become the U.S. Air Force. He wanted to fly. But there was a problem. To become an air cadet one had to have a college degree.
Carrillo, a California Mexican American, did not have one because he couldn't afford it. When he went to enlist he was working in a warehouse for MJB Coffee in San Francisco. However, Carrillo was nothing if not resourceful. Where the application form asked for his education, he entered “College of Hard Knox.”
In Carrillo's words: “Nobody paid any attention until it came time for me to raise my arm and say, “I will... So then they say, ‘Well, wait a minute,’ and I say, “One of the best colleges in the world.” If Carrillo had known how many “hard knox” awaited him in Europe, he might have had some second thoughts. In any case, he struck a deal with the Army: if he failed the cadet program, he would have to remain in the regular army rather than returning right away to civilian life.
“I felt I could pass everything, so I agreed to that… Consequently, I finished the program and became a Second Lieutenant.”
After pilot training at various U.S. locations, Lt. Carrillo flew a B-17 bomber to England in 1943, where he was assigned to the 100th Bomber Group of the Third Division, U.S. Air Force. The U.S. Air Force by then had joined the British Royal Air Force (RAF) in attacking German targets in occupied France. England was in turn being bombed by the Luftwaffe, the German Air Force, and as a consequence London and other large cities were blacked out at night.
“God, it was dark…we'd wander around at night, and they had their emergency water system…big steel tanks right in the middle of the street [to respond to fires].Every now and then, Goddamn, I'd run into one of them and nearly shake my brains loose.”
While in London Carrillo would attend stage plays and get to meet some of the British people. As an American officer he was welcomed everywhere (“We were saving their butts and they knew it”), but the class-conscious British had a difficult time understanding how a working class man had attained the rank of lieutenant, then captain, in the U.S. Air Force. When setting out on a bombing mission, the bombing crews first went to a briefing.


“In the briefing room we had this great big map of Europe, with two doors that closed in front of it. [Initially] they only opened the left half because it was mostly France. That was about the limit of our range, because you get out too far and then you had no fighter protection. I mean, even when you're out there with 40 or 50 bombers, if they could muster 50, 60 or a hundred fighters, they could raise a lot of hell.”
The Third Division was known as the Square D, for the insignia on the tail of each bomber. The German fighter planes had it in for this particular group because of an incident that had taken place on an early bombing run.
“When you fly combat, if you, in essence, give up, you dropped your wheels, you dropped your landing gear, that meant you give up. Well, one of our bombers got hit in the electrical controls for the landing gear.
“So it went down, and the German that was giving them a bad time assumed that it was giving up, so he let off, kind of backed off. The guys in the tail didn't know that, so they kept shooting and knocked him out of the sky. So, we became the scourge of the Luftwaffe. Their espionage knew when we were flying, and they would seek us out, they would come to us. And they did a good job. There was one mission on which 20 one planes went out and only one came back.
Toward the end of 1943 the British and American air forces started closing the ring on German military targets: oil refineries, aircraft factories, and railroad yards. With the introduction of newer fighter planes with longer ranges, such as the P-51 Mustang, the bombers started going deeper into Europe.
“So one day we came to the briefing room and they opened [the door to the right side of the map]…and they told us, you're going to Berlin…March of 1944. That put a big lump in your throat, because a lot of the guys say, well, I wasn't scared, but they're damn liars, ‘cause they were scared.”
Hermann Goring, the head of the Luftwaffe and Hitler's second in command, had promised the German people that the Allies would never bomb Berlin, so the city was very heavily defended with anti-aircraft batteries and fighter planes. According to military historian Rick Atkinson, in the first half of 1944, casualty rates for American and British bomber crewmen was 89%, of which most were killed or missing in action. Only one in four U.S. airmen completed twenty-five missions over Germany.

On William Carrillo's fifty-fifth mission, his B-17, nicknamed the "Square D," was shot down over Berlin. It was May 1944, only a month before the D-Day Allied invasion of France. His co-pilot and radio operator were killed and went down with the airplane. How many others of the ten-member crew survived he never knew, but he was able to bail out, and landed on the slate roof of a Berlin house.
At that point in the war all of the military age German men were in the armed forces, and the Germans had formed a home guard called the Volkssturm, made up mostly of older men, some of them veterans of World War I. As luck would have it, Lt. Carrillo had crashed through the roof of a Volkssturmer, ending up partly in and partly out of the house. After the man had pulled Carrillo all the way into his house, there was a stand-off.
“I'm standing there and he's looking at me. I really think one was just as scared as the other. He kept sticking me in the belly with his bayonet. Well, in the process he set off one of my Mae West CO2 cartridges [which inflated the Mae West life preserver all airmen wore when flying over water].
“So he hit one and one side started to expand. It scared him, and he cocked the damned old rifle, and I really thought he was going to shoot me, but he didn't.”
Instead he took Carrillo downstairs and turned him over to the Gestapo, the German secret police, who took him to their headquarters.
“So they beat the hell out of me… they would kick you in the groin, and when you doubled over they would kick you in the face. Then you couldn't breathe, you'd just collapse, and they would kick you some more.”
The Germans knew that the allies were planning to invade France in what would come to be known as D-Day, and they thought the captive airmen might know something about it. So his captors turned Carrillo over to the Luftwaffe's interrogation center, located in Frankfurt.
“We'd been warned about the interrogators… They told us about one fellow that they called the Gold Tooth Major, an American from New York whose lineage was German. He was the top dog, gray-haired and had a gold tooth right in front.
“Adjacent to the interrogation center was a recreation center for Luftwaffe pilots.They had a big swimming pool and a lot of young ladies…and they were running around nude…and they would do what nature does at any given time, in any position, in any spot, in the water, out of the water, on the edge, upside down, every which way, you know.”
By mid-1944, the Luftwaffe was desperately short of trained pilots because of the unrelenting war of attrition being fought over Germany every day and every night. To Carrillo's surprise, the Gold Tooth Major tried to recruit him into the Luftwaffe, imploring him to join the Germans in fighting the Bolsheviks.

As Germany was definitively losing the war, the top Nazi leadership clung to the forlorn hope that the Allied coalition would fall apart and the Western democracies would join with them in fighting the Soviet Union. And he'd tell me, “go to the window” [overlooking the pool], and he'd offer me a beer.Well, I wasn't interested in any beer. I mean I wasn't crying or cringing, but, you know, in that position you're not looking for pretty girls, or naked girls. Finally, he realized he was barking up a tree so he left me alone.”
During the war, the Germans had an elaborate espionage system in Europe and overseas. This included subscribing to every newspaper published in the United States in order to track American service personnel. As part of Carrillo's interrogation, the Gold Tooth Major brought out several large books, each the length and width of a newspaper, and started leafing through them.
“So he goes ‘A…B…C…D’…and he stops. I see the Square D and my face felt flushed.”
As it turned out, the Gold Tooth Major knew almost as much about Carrillo as Carrillo knew about himself: his birth date and birthplace, the names of his parents, the location of his barracks in England. They had information about him up until a few days before he was shot down. “He says, ‘This is where you sleep, your bicycle, your briefing room used to be your mess hall.’
“And he showed me everything…’You have a brother in the military, you work for MJB Coffee…’”
After the interrogation concluded, Carrillo was taken to a compound called Stalag 3, which held hundreds of prisoners of war, some of whom he knew. In 1945, as the Red Army approached Germany, now-Captain Carrillo was moved to a camp close to Munich. There he was liberated by American Armed Forces under the command of General George Patton, with Patton personally driving the tank that crashed through the gates of the camp. Soon thereafter, Hitler was dead and the war in Europe was over.
After his return to California and civilian life, William Carrillo married Veronica in 1948, with whom he eventually had five children.
He also went back to work for MJB Coffee.
According to his daughter Kris Carrillo: “When he returned from the war he was given the opportunity to work in the roasting room—I'm sure that was because of his WWII status, and was a promotion from being a janitor before the war. He quickly became the go-to guy because he was smart, he spoke fluent English, he was a hard worker and he knew how to fix anything mechanical.
“All during my childhood throughout the 50s/60s, he was a union employee and eventually moved into management probably in the early 70s. He had been a production foreman before that. So his WWII service influenced his ultimate position in management by giving him the opportunity to prove himself, but it was really through his hard work and loyalty that he eventually worked his way up in the company.
“My favorite story has to do with a conversation he had with one of his superiors, a white guy. They were on the rooftop of the MJB plant. From the rooftop in downtown San Francisco they could look across the bay at the UC Berkeley Campanile bell tower. My dad wistfully said something like “someday my kids might go there to college.”
[The man] said, “Your kids won't go to UC, because they are dumb Mexicans just like you.” Because he was not in a position to challenge the remark, he just had to simmer, for years. Many years later, long after this guy had left MJB, my dad looked him up while he was recuperating from a major illness. My dad brought him a get-well card that was stuffed with copies of my diploma from Cal and my sister's diploma from Stanford. He felt so vindicated and proud. That's my dad, always wanting to set the record straight!

William Carrillo is featured, along with three other Latino World War II veterans, in the oral history documentary “Latino Stories of World War II.” More information about the DVD is available from Mario Barrera at: mbarrera8@yahoo.com.

Mario Barrera grew up in Mission, a South Texas border town. After graduating from the University of Texas, he spent the ‘60s in graduate school at UC Berkeley, then taught politics, film analysis, screenwriting and ethnic studies and is considered one of the founders of the field of Chicano Studies in the ‘70s. His best known work is Race and Class in the Southwest (1979). His film credits include the documentaries “Chicano Park” and “Latino Stories of World War II,” plus the comedy short, “The Party Line.” A farcical, romantic romp of a novel, Kitty and Shep (2015), is available from DogEarPublishing.net and Amazon.com.

MEMO 2:

Crew's 13th Mission.  For additional info on Mission see "Days Not Forgotten"

William "RED" Carrillo
1919 - 2015
William Carrillo Obituary

William Carrillo
In Daly City. William Carrillo, the son of Francisco Carrillo and Gertrude Ochoa, was born on February 11, 1919, in Los Angeles. After a hardscrabble childhood in the border town areas of southern California, he moved with his family to San Francisco as a teenager in the 1930s. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942 and became a pilot with the 100th Bomber Group, 3rd Division of the 8th Air Force. During WWII he was stationed in Thorpe Abbots and London, England, and flew missions over France and Germany. On his 55th mission his B-17 was shot down over Germany and he spent 11 months as a POW, ultimately being liberated in April 1945 by American Armed Forces under the command of General Patton. Upon returning home to San Francisco, he resumed his job with MJB Coffee and married the incomparably lovely Veronica Alves in 1948. He stayed at MJB for 54 years and worked his way up from janitor to coffee roaster and ultimately manager of production until his retirement in 1995 at age 76.

William was known as "Red" to his family and Bill to his friends. And he had plenty of both. He'd chat you up in a heartbeat, give you the shirt off his back, give you hell if you messed up, and defend you like a badger if you were family. Proud to be a veteran, and a lifelong Democrat, he flew his American flag on every national holiday. He was also a 49er Faithful and bought season tickets every year for 50 years, starting in 1946.

William is survived by his wife Veronica; his brother Frank of Stockton, CA; his children Karen (Pierre), Kristine (Rolf), Kim (Brian), Kent (Nancy) and Kirk (Cathy); 13 grandchildren, and 2 great-grandchildren. His sisters Anna Falconi, Norma Carrillo, and brother Ramon (Ray) Barbarena predeceased him. Special thanks to the dedicated and kind caregivers who helped our father in his final days. We are heartbroken to lose him, our father, grandfather, and hero; he made us all smile. Que Dios te bendigas.

Friends and family may visit Wednesday, June 24, from 4pm to 9 pm and to the Vigil Service at 7 pm and to the Funeral Liturgy on Thursday, June 25, at 11 am ALL at Duggan's Serra Mortuary, 500 Westlake Ave, Daly City. Committal Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma.
Published in San Francisco Chronicle on June 23, 2015
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/sfgate/obituary.aspx?n=william-carrillo&pid=175129598&fhid=2515#sthash.BOWrZoKO.fgAxLUGF.dpuf

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: Berlin DATE: 1944-05-24  
AIRCRAFT: "Big Stoop" (42-31941) CAUSE: EAC  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  

PHOTOS:

Lt William "RED" Carrillo, BOM on Lt Williamson Crew. (100th BG Photo Archives)

Lt William "RED" Carrillo, BOM on Lt Williamson Crew. (photo Courtesy of Son Kirk Carrillo) 

About 15 years ago, I was able to get my Dad, Bill "Red" Carrillo and I on a B-17 flight at Evergreen Aviation in Oregon. I worked there at the time. During the flight, we wandered up to the cockpit and when the pilot realized my Dad had served in B-17s, he got out of the left seat and let my Dad have it for about 15 minutes. The co-pilot took this picture. Kirk Carrillo

Lindley L. Williamson Crew (left to right)
Standing: Lt. Williamson (P), Lt. Dennis (CP), Lt. Barfield (NAV), Lt. Carillo (BOM)
Kneeling: S/Sgt. Sullivan (WG), Sgt. Marshall (WG), S/Sgt. Kouns (ROG),
Sgt. Anderson (TG), Sgt. Sewell (TTE), Sgt. Townsend (BTG)
Photo courtesy of Denise Normandin, Sgt. Anderson's daughter.
Photo ID by Bill (Red) Carrillo - On 1/2/2005, Red Carrillo stated that Sullivan was a WG and Sewell was the TTE

 

SERVED IN:

Crew 1

ID: 777