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LT  Edward P. MCKEAGUE

UNIT: 349th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: P

Class 1943-H
McKeague, Edward P.
He had Basic at Gunter Field, AL. and graduated from George Field, Lawrence County, IL. S/N: O-811419. He was in the 100th Bomb Group 349th Bomb Sqdn. On June 12, 1944, he was pilot of a B-17G (S/N: 42-97883) with a crew of 10 on a mission to Rosières-en-Santerre in France. The plane was hit by flak over Dunkirk. No. 3 engine caught fire and the fire spread to engine 4. Engines 1 and 2 were also damaged. He left the formation in a dive in an attempt to put out the fire, but each time he levelled out the fire would start again. While flying parallel to the English coast, he ordered his crew to bail out. He was the last to leave the ship, at 800 feet. He was picked up by a life boat, probably from the Royal Navy, but several others in his crew drowned, failed to open their chutes, or were M.I.A. (MACR #6521). McKeague died a few days later.

Lt. Edward P. McKeague (100th Bomb Group Archives)

SERIAL #: O-811419 STATUS: KIA
MACR: 06521 CR: 06521

Comments1: 12 JUN 44 ROSIERE\DUNKIRK (FLAK - CRASHED AT SEA)

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW

 2nd Lt Edward P.McKeague            P    KIA/DOW   12 JUN 44 Rosieres-Dunkirk (See 26 Jul 1996 Letter to H. F. Cruver from Charles S. Harding)
 2nd Lt Frank A,Ritter                   CP     KIA           12 JUN 44 Rosieres-Dunkirk
 2nd Lt Joseph C. Sivestro          NAV     KIA           24 MAY 44  BERLIN (KIA with Lt Hoskinson crew, see below)
 2nd Lt Armand Cardea              BOM     NOC 
  S/Sgt William H.Allen,Jr.           ROG      KIA          12 JUN 44 Rosieres-Dunkirk
    Sgt George H.Penman           TTE      RESCUED  12 JUN 44 Rosieres-Dunkirk
    Sgt James L.Swafford            BTG      KIA          12 JUN 44 Rosieres-Dunkirk 
  S/Sgt Alfred H. Hudnall               TG     KIA          12 JUN 44 Rosieres-Dunkirk  (flying as LWG that day)

349th Sqdn.  Crew above joined the 100th on 9 May 44.   
S/Sgt Marccena F. Dottoviano flew 8 missions with this crew as LWG & TG.  He was KIA on 29 JUL 44 mission to Merseburg w/Lt Gustafson's Crew, Killed by Civilians)
S/Sgt Robert Gallagher flew as RWG on this crew. He was assigned to the 349th BS on 25 May 44 with no crew.
S/Sgt E.B. Peters, TOGG, flew missions with Lt J.C. Moore Crew as TOGG. 

Missions of Lt Ed McKeague ( mpf 2003)

1.   25/05/44    BRUSSELS                  A/C# 231347   BILLY BOY
2.   27/05.44    STRASSBOURG           A/C# 231347   BILLY BOY
3.   28/05/44    MAGDEBURG              A/C# 231347   BILLY BOY
4.   29/05/44    LEIPZIG                     A/C# 231347   BILLY BOY
5.   30/05/44    TROYES                    A/C# 2102977 (no name, later called TRAPS) 
6.   02/06/44    BOULOGNE                A/C# 2102937 95TH BG AIRCRAFT 
7.   05/06/44    BOULOGNE                A/C# 2102621  VARGA VENUS
8.   06/06/44    FALAISE (D-DAY)        A/C# 231347   BILLY BOY
9.   07/06/44    NANTES                     A/C# 2107211  no name
10. 12/06/44    ROSIERES & DUNKIRK   A/C# 297883  MISS LOLLIPOP


Date Crew Nbr Mission Nbr Last Name Initial Rank Position Aircraft Nbr Target
5/25/1944 38 122 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 SWAFFORD J.L. S/SGT BTG 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 PETERS E.B. S/SGT BOM 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 LOUROE S.M. LT NAV 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 RITTER F.A. LT CP 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 31347 BRUSSELS
5/25/1944 38 122 DOTTOVIANO M.F. S/SGT LWG 31347 BRUSSELS

5/27/1944 38 123 LOUROE S.M. LT NAV 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 RITTER F.A. LT CP 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 PETERS E.B. S/SGT BOM 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 SWAFFORD J.L. S/SGT BTG 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 PONTZIOUS J.A. S/SGT LWG 31347 STRASBOURG
5/27/1944 38 123 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 31347 STRASBOURG

5/28/1944 38 124 KING S.M. CAPT NAV 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 RITTER F.A. LT CP 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 CARDEA A. LT BOM 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 SWAFFORD J.L. S/SGT BTG 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 DOTTOVIANO M.F. S/SGT LWG 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 31347 MAGDEBURG
5/28/1944 38 124 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 31347 MAGDEBURG

5/29/1944 38 125 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 KIEFER N.L. S/SGT BTG 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 CARDEA A. LT BOM 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 KING S.M. CAPT NAV 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 RITTER F.A. LT CP 31347 LEIPZIG
5/29/1944 38 125 DOTTOVIANO M.F. S/SGT LWG 31347 LEIPZIG

5/30/1944 38 126 MADDOX J.H. LT NAV 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 KIEFER N.L. S/SGT BTG 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 DOTTOVIANO M.F. S/SGT LWG 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 CARDEA A. LT BOM 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 RITTER F.A. LT CP 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 102977 TROYES
5/30/1944 38 126 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 102977 TROYES

6/2/1944 38 128 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 DOTTOVIANO M.F. S/SGT LWG 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 KIEFER N.L. S/SGT BTG 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 LOUROS S.M. LT NAV 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 RITTER F.A. LT CP 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 103937 BOULOGNE
6/2/1944 38 128 CARDEA A. LT BOM 103937 BOULOGNE

6/5/1944 38 131 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 DOTTOVIANO M.P. S/SGT LWG 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 CARDEA A. LT NAV 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT TG 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 KIEFER N.L. S/SGT BTG 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 PETERS E.B. T/SGT TOG 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)
6/5/1944 38 131 RITTER F.A. LT CP 102621 BOULOGNE(CHG)

6/6/1944 38 -132 RITTER F.A. LT CP 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 31347 /OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 LOUROE S.M. LT NAV 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 KIEFER N.L. S/SGT BTG 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT LWG 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 GREIL L.A. S/SGT BOM 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 DOTTOVIANO M.P. S/SGT TG 31347 OUISTREHAM
6/6/1944 38 -132 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 31347 OUISTREHAM

6/7/1944 38 -135 PENMAN C.H. T/SGT TTE 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 RITTER F.A. LT CP 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 SWAFFORD J.L. S/SGT BTG 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 PETERS E.B. S/SGT BOM 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 LOUROE S.M. LT NAV 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 HUDNALL A.M. S/SGT LWG 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 DOTTOVIANO M.P. S/SGT TG 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 GALLAGHER R.A. S/SGT RWG 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 MCKEAGUE E.P. LT P 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)
6/7/1944 38 -135 ALLEN W.H. T/SGT ROG 107211 NANTES (BRIDGES)


                                              "Miss Lollipop"

 DATE: 12 June 1944 349th Sqdn.                A/C #42-97883

 TARGET: Rosieres-En-Santerre                  MACR #6521,Micro-fiche #2355
         (NW France)


 2nd Lt Edward P.McKeague            P    KIA/DOW   (See 26 Jul 1996 Letter to Harry F. Cruver from Charles S. Harding)
 2nd Lt Frank A,Ritter                    CP    KIA  
 2nd Lt Stelios M.Louros             NAV   KIA (from Kohler crew - - see below)
  T/Sgt Evan B.Peters               Togg   KIA (body recovered, buried at Cambridge) flew missions on Lt Moore's Crew as Togg
  S/Sgt William H.Allen,Jr.           ROG    KIA 
    Sgt George H.Penman             TTE  RESCUED
    Sgt James L.Swafford             BTG   KIA
  S/Sgt Robert Gallagher             RWG   RESCUED
  S/Sgt Alfred H. Hudnall             LWG   KIA
    Sgt Joseph Pellegrino                TG   KIA

"A/C 42-97883 WAS HIT BY FLAK OVER DUNKIRK AT 0855 HOURS, SETTING THE NO # 4 ENGINE ON FIRE.  LAST SEEN AT 0905 HOURS WITH THE RIGHT WING ON FIRE, NEAR THE NO # 4 ENGINE.  LASTEST REPORTS INDICATE THAT A PILOT AND TWO GUNNERS WERE PICKED UP IN THE CHANNEL. NO OTHER INFORMATION AVAILABLE."
                               THE ABOVE FROM THE OPERATIONAL NARRATIVE OF 12 JUN 1944..
  
IN FACT LT MCKEAGUE WAS RESCUED BY A BRITISH MINESWEEEPER, ALONG WITH WG ROBERT GALLAGHER AND TTE GEORGE PENMAN, ONLY TO DIE A FEW DAYS LATER FROM WHAT WAS REPORTED AS SHOCK AND EXPOSURE.  THE REMAINING CREWMEN WERE KIA.


 A good sumrmary of events relating to this last mission is given in Sgt. Penman's report below:

 Subject: Supplement to Missing A/C Report,Sgt.George H.Penman,12187389,          A/C #883.

 TO     : Commanding General,3rd Bombardment Division, APO #    559

        1,The following is a version of what happened to A/C 883 and the  crew of Lt.E.P.McKeague who flew 
 on the Operational Mission of 12 June 1944 to Rosieres-En-Santerre in North Western France

 "The time was about 1035 and our altitude about 26,000 feet as we were leaving the French coast.
 We were hit dirert by anti-aircraft fire. No.4 engine went on fire and simultaneously No.3 engine burst 
into flames also. The RWG,S/Sgt.Robert A.Gallagher,was the first to report the fire over the
 inter-phone and was instructed by the pilot to watch it carefully.He was asked to describe the fire in detail 
as the pilot put the ship into a dive and feathered engs 3 and 4. Our airspeed indicator was fluctuating on 300
 MPH indicated airspeed. The RWG's voice came over the inter-phone stating that the ball turret had 
received a direct hit and that the Radio operator was assisting the BT operator out of the turret to render 
first aid to him,but in vain. The pilot called back the WG asking how the fire was and the WG told him
 it was getting worse. Pilot then ordered everybody to bail out as we would land in the vicinity of three mine
 sweepers we were headed for. I turned around and crawled through my top turret and on to the catwalk 
in the bomb bay and jumped. The bombbay door would not close electrically after release of our
 bombs thus preventing and possibility of ditching.

 I landed about 3,000 yards away from one mine sweeper and was in the water,as told by the Captain 
of the ship,for about 20 minutes.The same mine sweeper brought our RWG and myself back to Dover
 where we were in the Hospital eight days before returning to our home base."
 Sgt.George H.Penman
 349th Bomb.Sqdn.
 100th Bomb.Group (H)
   19 July 1944


"June 12th 1944 - Walmer, Kent.
At 09:15 in the morning the coastguard reported that an American Fortress
aeroplane had crashed in the sea to the south-east. The lifeboat men had
already seen a parachute coming down. A light westerly wind was blowing,
with a choppy sea. The motor lifeboat 'Charles Dibdin (Civil Service No. 2)'
was launched at 09:20 and two and a half miles east by south of the lifeboat
station picked up an exhausted airman. As she neared land a small boat put
out and took the airman ashore, so that the lifeboat could continue her
search. This she did for some time, but without result, and returned at
noon. Other airmen had baled out previously east of the Goodwins and some
had been saved by an RAF rescue boat and minesweepers.
Rewards £9 19s"
(Source: Supplement to Annual Reports of the Royal National Lifeboat
Institution 1939-46


 Other information indicates that Lt.McKeague was also rescued but died a few days later.
 Crew apparently bailed out about 500 yards from English coast at about 2,500
 feet altitude at approximately 5112N - 0124E.

 Frank Ritter's name is inscribed on THE WALL OF THE MISSING at Cambridge
 and Evan Peters is buried there in Plot F,Row 4,Grave 69.
*************************************************************************************************************

Copyrighted material:

                                                            Miss Lollipop and Her Crew by Ross McNeill
You are browsing in:
Archive List > Allied and Commonwealth Forces
 
Contributed by  Ross McNeill 
Article ID:  A1127800 
Contributed on:  30 July 2003 
March 1944
A new B17-G aeroplane is rolled out onto the apron at Vega's Burbank works, it has cost the US taxpayer $247,000 so far. 

A Vega employee gives it the name Miss Lollipop, in the hope that that it will be a good ship and bring its crew back safely. But the clock is running - Miss Lollipop has less than three months of service ahead.

24 March 1944
Miss Lollipop arrives at Tulsa for acceptance into the USAAF as #42-97883 and is wheeled into the hangar to be fitted out with her war equipment.

21 days left
The refit is complete and Miss Lollipop is needed in England for the D-Day invasion, along with all other finished aircraft. The long transit flight starts from Nebraska with a number of short hops across America. At each overnight stage, more war-ready B17s join the flight and the pace quickens.

13 days left
The flight has reached New Hampshire and is getting ready for the ten-hour trip across the Atlantic Ocean to England. The crew now joins. They are a mix of six from New York State and four from the Confederacy. A new crew for the new aircraft. 

Atlantic Transport Command assigns Miss Lollipop and the crew to the 349th Bombardment Squadron of the 100th Bombardment Group at Thorpe Abbotts.

11 days left
The Bloody 100th is the new home for Miss Lollipop and missions start immediately. The group is doing all it can to destroy the French rail and communication network before D-Day in five days' time, and needs every aircraft for the job.

20 minutes left
A total of 769 B17s are leaving airfield targets in northern France after their bomb runs. Miss Lollipop has a problem. The bomb bay doors will not close, but she keeps up with the group at 26,000 feet.

Ten minutes left
The group has reached the Channel and flak is coming up from Calais coastal defences. Miss Lollipop takes a hit on number four engine. The right waist gunner sees fire under the wing and reports it to the pilot. 

Number three engine is now alight. A further flak burst hits the underside of the aircraft, wounding the ball turret gunner. The radio operator drags the ball gunner out of his turret onto the floor of the radio room to deal with his injuries. The right waist gunner reports the fire spreading and hears number two engine running rough.

Five minutes left
The pilot has feathered both number three and number four engines but the fire extinguisher systems have had no effect. Miss Lollipop has been put into a series of steep dives to blow the fire out, but each time they level out the right waist gunner reports the fire blazing up again. The aircraft is now at 2,500 feet and flying parallel to the English coast.

Miss Lollipop has now been seen by the coast watchers. An Air Sea Rescue launch from Ramsgate, on standby at a buoy, is given the crash call and heads for the aircraft. The civilian lifeboat crew have seen the situation and are already underway when they receive the rescue call to Miss Lollipop. A further Air Sea Rescue launch slips its moorings in Dover harbour and heads for the scene.

The pilot is struggling to keep Miss Lollipop airborne and alters course to pass over three minesweepers. With no alternatives he orders the crew to abandon so they can be picked up quickly.

The tail gunner is first to leave through the waist position, but his parachute does not open. The left waist gunner has frozen with fear and the right waist gunner takes command and aids him out of the waist door, but his parachute also fails to open. The right waist gunner looks back into the radio room but cannot see any more crew, so he abandons and correctly deploys his parachute before landing near the minesweepers.

In the nose of Miss Lollipop the engineer has turned, crawled through his turret and is standing on the walkway between the bomb racks. He looks aft but can see no sign of the crew so he bails out through the open bomb doors.

Two minutes left
The last man to leave is the pilot, but he has left it too late as Miss Lollipop is now at 800 feet and his parachute does not open fully. 

The end for Miss Lollipop
Miss Lollipop noses over and dives into the English Channel.

After 25 minutes the minesweepers pick up the right waist gunner and the engineer from the Channel, alive. The lifeboat picks up the fatally wounded pilot and puts him ashore before continuing the search for the rest of his crew.

The Air Sea Rescue launches search the area where Miss Lollipop crashed, then back-track towards the minesweepers before returning to base four hours later. The body of the bombardier is the only other crew member recovered. 

55 years later
Divers find the shattered remains of Miss Lollipop 60 feet down and just one mile short of the English Coast.
 


**********************************************************************************************************
CREW
2ND LT PAUL E. KOHLER           P CPT 30 DEC 44 KASSEL, MY
2ND LT  MICHAEL G. HUDAK    CP CPT 12 OCT 44 BREMEN, AC FACTORY
2ND LT STELIOS M. LOUROS   NAV KIA 12 JUN 44 ROSIERES & DUNKIRD SHORE DEF
2ND LT JAMES H. WOOD        BOM CPT 12 OCT 44 BREMEN, AC FACTORY
S/SGT EARNEST R. LOOMIS  ROG CPT O3 OCT 44 LUDWIGBURG, ILLESHEIM,NUNRBURGS
S/SGT VERON L. TERRELL     TTE CPT O3 OCT 44 LUDWIGBURG, ILLESHEIM,NUNRBURGS
SGT BERT CASSLES              BTG NOC
SGT KURWIN F. DECH          RWG CPT O3 OCT 44 LUDWIGBURG, ILLESHEIM,NUNRBURGS
SGT GEORGE M. WICKLAND    LWG NOC
SGT MARIO J.LONDRA             TG NOC

349TH SQDN.. CREW, AS  ABOVE, JOINED THE 100TH ON 25 MAY 44

LT STELIOS LOUROS WAS KIA WITH THE McKEAGUE CREW AT ROSIERES & DUNKIRK SHORE DEF (12 JUN 44) 

CREW
1st Lt Martin T.Hoskinson    P KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN
2nd Lt Marvin H.Apking     CP KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN                        BERLIN  24 MAY 1944; THE 100TH LOST 9 AIRCRAFT
2nd Lt Norman G.Robitoy BOM KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN                                                    ON THIS MISSION.
S/Sgt Jerome Miller      ROG KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN 
S/Sgt Thomas L.Sibert   TTE KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN 
  Sgt Salvadore Romero  BTG KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN                          A/C#42 102635
  Sgt George Sneckus    RWG KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN                          MACR #5171, Microfiche #1854
  Sgt A.V.Perry          LWG KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN 
  Sgt Marlyn M.Schrader     TG KIA 24/5/44 BERLIN 

349th Sqdn. Crew,as above,joined the 100th Group on 9/5/44. Thls was probably their first or second mission. On 
24/5/44, Lt.Joseph C.Silvestro,from the crew of E.P.Mcleague, was flying as navigator end was KIA. One report indicates
a 1000 lb bomb from a plane in the high squadron fell on this aircraft forward of the horizontal stablizer breaking the 
ship in two pieces. The main fuselage immediately went into a tight spin which precluded anyone baling out.


E-Mail note from Robert Black to Michael P. Faley (May 21, 2001)
Subject: Martin Hoskinson crash
It has been reported that this plane, which went down on May 24, 1944, may have been hit by a bomb from an American plane above. It seems this is not true. I have been in touch with a German researcher who sent me the following:

Dear Robert:
Please let me give you an overview from this day out of the German eyes: On this May 24, 1944 was from the Germans point of view a big air battle in the region of south Schleswig-Holstein, the northernmost county of Germany with border to Denmark.
The combat boxes of the BG's were flying in lots of cirrus clouds and the sight was extremely bad. So the German fighters made lots of passes and could not see exactly distances to the bombers. They said it was a milky haze from the cirrus and from the smoke of the engines.. In this air battle only in our region were KIA 3 fighter pilots, one of them was the wing commander of I./JG 11 1st. Lt. Konig. Konig was coming from the night fighters with only one eye and on this day due to extreme bad view he crashed into a B-17, obviously on one of the three reported. His wing was seen falling off and his FW 190 spiraled down.
After his death 1st. Lt. Koing was made Captain and got the knights cross. Another two pilots were shot down and wounded. In the air was a mixture of Me 109s and FW 190s.
This battle is called "Die Luftschlacht bei Kaltenkirchen" the air battle at Kaltenkirchen. Kaltenkirchen a/f was a well-known airfield in the region.
From Kaltenkirchen a/f to the crash point of the three B-17
Nr. 2102635 Hoskinson at east of Itzstedt
Nr. 2102648 Roeder at west of Sulfeld
Nr. 21026624 Johnson northeast of Rotenhahn
are only about 30 km.
2102635 Hoskinson at Itzstedt and 2102648 Roeder at Sulfeld crashed only 200 m away from each other and I think that one of them had the air crash with commander Konig, If you know what position Hoskinson was flying it would be possible to say exactly that this ship had the crash.
The whole formation of I./JG 11 on this day had only 9 or 11 planes! (in another e-mail from our contact he reports another 30 German planes were in the air battle bringing the total to 40 which our U.S. records indicate.)
Should have had 27. The school chronicle says, that the plane with big noise came down out of the clouds and crashed into the earth exploding and burning with a big cloud of smoke. All airmen in the Itzstedt B-17 were dead inside the plane and burned by fire and the 10th lay outside the plane on a field. .
Robert L. Black, survivor of 2102624, crashed at Rotenhahn, had not seen a German fighter crashing into his plane as the survivors of the Roeder crew did not.. So from todays point of view 1st. Lt. Konig must have crashed into 2102635 Hoskinson.
In an earlier book by German fighter Fritz Engau says " This head on attack was one of the strangest and almost ghostly mission of I./JG 11. In more than 6,000 M (about 20,000 feet) the first B-17 appeared shadowy in a milky haze and made their vapor trails in this haze. The following b-17s made more and more vapor trails into haze and condensed the carped. Lt. Konig, who had only one eye made his head on pass obviously to late and crashed by accident into the B-17. Engau was flying second to the right and he saw something like a flash or explosion and thereafter-big pieces in the air. He had as well a B-17 in his Revi and shot some rounds but he got no credit this day.  Lt. Hans Heinrich "King" Konig was one of the experienced day fighting commanders with 28 credits-20 4 engine bombers…………..Bob Black

MEMO 2:

Rescued by British Minesweeper, but died from shock and exposure a few days later.  See McKeague Memo,

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: Berlin DATE: 1944-06-12  
AIRCRAFT: "Miss Lollipop" (42-97883) CAUSE: FLAK - Crashed at Sea  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  

PHOTOS:

Edward P. McKeague Crew. This crew was hit by flak over the French Coast outbound from the target and ditched in the English Channel. Only Geroge Penman and Robert Gallagher were rescued.   Detailed Information    (100th Photo Archives)

Memorial Plaque done for Lt Louros

 Spark Plug from MISS LOLLIPOP- AC #42-97883.Miss Lollipop, flown by the Ed McKeague crew, crashed into the English Channel on 12 June 44. Only two crew members survived. 

 Spark Plug and bullets from MISS LOLLIPOP- AC #42-97883.Miss Lollipop, flown by the Ed McKeague crew, crashed into the English Channel on 12 June 44. Only two crew members survived. 

 Bullets from MISS LOLLIPOP- AC #42-97883.Miss Lollipop, flown by the Ed McKeague crew, crashed into the English Channel on 12 June 44. Only two crew members survived. 

 Bullets from MISS LOLLIPOP- AC #42-97883.Miss Lollipop, flown by the Ed McKeague crew, crashed into the English Channel on 12 June 44. Only two crew members survived. 

Lt Ed McKeague mission on 12 June 1944 Rosieres-En-Santerre in "Miss Lollipop"A/C #42-97883
               

 

SERVED IN:

Crew 1

ID: 13377