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S/SGT  Joseph M. WALTERS

UNIT: 418th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: WG
SERIAL #: STATUS: CPT
MACR:

Comments1: 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW

2ND LT FREDERICK H. SCHAFFHAUSEN      P CPT 30 OCT 44 MERSEBURG
2ND LT VICTOR A. KOEHLER              CP CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA,      TAPS: 29 AUG 1952
F/O GEORGE W. RAY                      NAV CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA
2ND LT CLAUDE W. VAUGHN           BOM CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA        TAPS: 28 OCT 1982
S/SGT HOBART E. COOK                  ROG CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA      TAPS:  DEC 1959
S/SGT LEWIS C. GREEN                    TTE CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA
SGT SIDNEY J. BRAUD, JR                 BTG CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA
SGT JOHNIE J. FORTNER                  RWG CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA
SGT JOSEPH M. WALTERS                LWG CPT 16 NOV 44 AACHEN AREA  (received Purple Heart)
SGT ALEX SOOD (reassigned 3/Sept/44)   TG CPT 26 NOV 44 HAMM (WITH CREW OF LT HARRY HEMPY)


418TH SQDN.. CREW, AS ABOVE, JOINED THE 100TH ON 4 JUL 1944  AS CREW 76. 

Crew flew 5 different aircraft on 10 combat missions,July/44 (one was LADY GERALDINE).  Assigned "OUR BABE' on 3/AUG/44.,PILOT added "Hutchie" after "Our Babe" in honor of his wife."Our Babe Hutchie" was destroyed in combat,11 Sept.44 on its 61st mission. Crew was assigned a new B-17G, fresh from the states which they named "MISS CONDUCT" (never painted on aircraft) #37636.  This plane was flown on 4 missions (Starting with the Russian Shuttle Mission) then the crew was assigned to #338545 LD-A which was painted "MISS CONDUCT"  IT WAS HEAVELY DAMAGED ON A MISSION 2 Oct 44 to Bohlen

AIRCRAFT CREWS WERE REDUCED FROM 10-9 MEN ON SEPTEMBER 3, 1944.  THE REASON, SOMEONE THOUGHT THE GERMAN FIGHTER CRAFT WERE NO LONGER AT FULL STRENGTH.  WITH ONE LESS WAIST GUNNER ON BOARD, THE B-17'S PAID A HIGH PENALTY DURING SUBSEQUENT FIGHTER ATTACKS.
BY SEPTEMBER 3RD,  SGT JOE WALTERS HAD RECOVERED FROM HIS COMBAT WOUNDS SUSTAINED ON THE CREWS SECOND MISSON TO SCHWEINFURT.
THE PILOT ELECTED TO HAVE JOE REJOIN THE CREW AND RELEASED  ALEX SOOD TO BE ASSIGNED TO LT HARRY HEMPY CREW.  AFTER THE PILOT COMPLETED HIS 33 MISSIONS ON OCTOBER 30TH, THE REMAINDER OF THE CREW FACED A SEVERE MENTAL STRAIN.  THE WEATHER HAD TURNED BAD. LOTS OF FRONTAL ACTIVITY.  THEY WERE BRIEFED 4 TIMES FOR MISSIONS, WENT OUT TO THE AIRCRAFT ONLY TO HAVE THE MISSION SCRUBBED BEFORE TAKE-OFF.  FINALLY, ON NOVEMBER 16TH, THEY COMPLETED THEIR LAST MISSION.
      (FROM SGT JOHNIE FORTNER LOG courtesy of Annette Fortner Harris)

 MISSION LOG OF CREW 76  (from Annette Fortner Harris)   (GP stands for General Purpose)

1.   JULY18,1944 HEMMINGSTADT, GERMANY: OIL REFINERY AND STORAGE DEPOT, SEVEN HOURS.  FIGHTER SUPPORT P-38's, P-47's AND P-51's  TAKE OFF:4:50, ENEMY COAST 8:00, TARGET 8:16, ENGLISH COAST 10:50, LANDED 11:30

2.  JULY 19, 1944 SCHWEINFURT, GERMANY: BALL BEARING WORKS, 7 HOURS.  TAKE OFF 5:40, ENEMY COAST 8:16, TARGET 9:43, ENEMY COAST 11:31 ENGLISH COAST 12:05, BASE 12:30.  FLAK HEAVY, FIGHTER SUPPORT P-38,47,51.  BOMB LOAD 5-1000LB, GAS MAXIMUM LOAD, LEFT WAIST GUNNER WOUNDED.  27 FLAK HOLES IN A/C

3.  JULY 20, 1944 MERSEBURG, GERMANY: OIL REFINERY & STORAGE TANKS.  BOMB LOAD 20-250LB, TAKE OFF: 6:35, LEAVE ENGLISH COAST: 8:59, TARGET-11:21, ENGLISH COAST-13:48, BASE-14:30. ALTITUDE 25,000FT.  FLAK MEDIUM AND ACCURATE. LOST LEAD SHIP IN BELGIUM. WENT AROUND OUTSKIRTS OF RUHR VALLEY, FLAK HEAVY

4.  JULY 21, 1944 REGENSBURG, GERMANY ME 109 ASSEMBLY PLANT.  TAKE OFF-6:00, ENGLISH COAST-8:12, TARGET-11:07, LEAVE ENEMY COAST-13:35 ENGLISH COAST-14:10, BASE 14:30. FLAK HEAVY, FIGHTER SUPPORT-P-38,47,51.  BOMB LOAD 5,000 LBS M.17s 100 INC CLUSTERS.  GAS: MAXIMUM LOAD

5.  JULY 24, 1944 ST LO, FRANCE  BATTLE LINES IN FRANCE. TAKE OFF-9:40, ENGLISH COAST-11:47, FRENCH COAST-12:13, TARGET-12:20, ENGLISH COAST-13:23, BASE-14:10.  FLAK MEDIUM, BOMB LOAD 38 100LB GP. GAS 2200.  FIGHTER SUPPORT: 8TH & 9TH AIR FORCE.

6.  JULY 25, 1944 ST LO, FRANCE  BATTLE LINES IN FRANCE.  TAKE OFF-7:10, TARGET-10:21,BASE-12:55 1500BOMBERS, 8TH&9TH AF SUPPORTFLAK MEDIUM, BOMB LOAD 38-100LB GP. GAS 2200 GAL.

7.  JULY 29, 1944 MERSEBURG, GERMANY OIL REFINERY. TAKE OFF-5:05, ENGLISH COAST-12:10, BASE: 13:05.  FLAK HEAVY, 1000 BOMBERS, GAS MAXIMUM, BOMB LOAD 20-250LB GP.  GROUP LOST 8 PLANES.

8. JULY 31, 1944 MUNICH, GERMANY  AIRCRAFT ENGINES.  TAKE OFF-9:05, ENGLISH COAST-11:05, FRENCH COAST 11:05, TARGET-13:23, 
FRENCH COAST-16:05, BASE-17:00.  BOMB LOAD: 11-500 GP BOMBS.  GAS-MAXIMUM, FLAK HEAVYFLEW A/C LADY GERALDINE.

9.  AUGUST 3, 1944 TROY, FRANCE  RAIL ROAD MARSHALLING YARDS.  TAKE OFF-12:04, ENGLISH COAST-14:19,  FRENCH COAST-14:54
TARGET-16:37, BELGIUM COAST-18:24, BASE-19:20. BOMB LOAD: 20 250LB GP.  FLAK MEDIUM

10. AUGUST 4, 1944 HAMBURG, GERMANY OIL REFINERY. TAKE OFF-9:00, ENGLISH COAST-11:17, GERMAN COAST-12:23, TARGET-13:40, 
ENGLISH COAST 15:25, BASE-16:00. BOMB LOAD 20-250 GP DELAYED ACTION.

11. AUGUST 5, 1944 MAGDEBURG, GERM. MARSHALLING YARDS. GERMANS MOVE FREIGHT THROUGH AT A  RATE OF 2400 CARS EVERY 12 HRS BOMB RESULTS EXCELLENT.  TAKE OFF-8:00, ENGLISH COAST-9:56, GERMAN COAST-11:35, TARGET 12:55 GERMAN COAST-14:10, BASE-14:20. BOMB LOAD 10-500LB GP.  FLAK HEAVY

12. AUGUST 6, 1944 BERLIN, GERMANY FW 190 PLANT, SOUTHEASTERN SECTION OF BERLIN. TAKE OFF-7:30, ENGLISH COAST-9:15, GERMAN COAST-11:11, TARGET-12:38, GERMAN COAST-13:45, BASE 15:50. BOMB LOAD: 10-500LB GP FLAK HEAVY, 5 B-17 WERE SHOT DOWN BY FLAK FROM GROUP JUST IN FRONT OF US. 760 FLAK GUNS

13. AUGUST 8, 1944 ST SYLVIAN, FRANCE SUPPORT BRITISH GROUND TROOPS.  TAKE OFF 8:40, ENGLISH COAST-11:30, FRENCH COAST-11:58 TARGET-12:38, ENGLISH COAST-13:11, BASE-14:09.  BOMB LOAD 12-500LB & 2-1000LB GP.  FLAK VERY HEAVY AND ACCURATE.

14. AUGUST 14, 1944 LUDWIGSHAVEN, GER SYNTHETIC OIL.  LAST HIGH PRIORITY OIL TARGET IN GERMANY.  TAKE OFF-7:56, ENGLISH COAST-9:57 BELGIUM COAST-10:21, TARGET-12:40, BELGIUM COAST-14:20, BASE-15:30.  FLAK MEDIUM BOMB LOAD-10-500 GP

15. AUGUST 18, 1944 PACY sur ARMANCON OIL DUMPS NORTHEAST OF AUXUENE FRANCE. TAKE OFF-10:20, ENGLISH COAST-12:13, CHERBOURG 12:48 TARGET 14:40, GERMAN COAST-17:40, BASE-18:20.  FLAK MEDIUM

16. AUGUST 24, 1944 RUHLAND, GERMANY SYNTHETIC OIL REFINERY, TAKE OFF-8:00, ENGLISH COAST-9:30, GERMAN COAST-11:11, TARGET-12:50 DUTCH COAST-14:52, BASE-16:00.  FLAK HEAVY

17. AUGUST 25, 1944 POLITZ/STITTON, GER SYNTHETIC OIL REFINERY. TAKE OFF-8:15, ENGLISH COAST-9:00, DUTCH COAST-11:45, TARGET-12:15 GERMAN COAST-12:45, BASE-14:00.  BOMB LOAD10-500LB GP.  FLAK HEAVY

18. AUGUST 30, 1944 BREMEN, GERMANY FW 190 PLANT.  TAKE OFF-12:33, ENGLISH COAST-13:15, GERMAN COAST-15:27, TARGET 15:59, 
GERMAN COAST-16:37, BASE-19:15. BOMB LOAD 38-100LB M-47.  FLAK HEAVY

19. SEPT. 3, 1944 BREST, FRANCE  GROUND DEFENSES.  TAKE OFF-6:05, ENGLISH COAST-8:10, CHERBOURG-9:10, TARGET-10:43
ENGLISH COAST-12:13, BASE-13:15.  BOMB LOAD 12-500LB, 3 AP. NO FLAK

20. SEPT. 18, 1944 WARSAW, POLAND SUPPLY DROP OF FOOD, AMMUNITION, MEDICAL SUPPLIES.  ENEMY COAST 9:22, RUSSIA-16:20
FLAK HEAVY.  START OF SECOND RUSSIAN SHUTTLE MISSION

21. SEPT. 19, 1944 SZOLNOK, HUNGARY TAKE OFF FROM RUSSIA-10:50, TARGET 14:49, FOGGIA, ITALY-16:54.  BOMB LOAD: 10-500LB RUSSIAN GP FLAK MEDIUM.

22. SEPT. 25, 1944 LUDWIGSHAVEN, GER. MARSHALLING YARDS. TAKE OFF-7:15, ENGLISH COAST-9:12, GERMAN COAST-10:00, TARGET-10:53 BASE-14:09.  FLAK MEDIUM

23. SEPT. 26, 1944 BREMEN, GERMANY FOCKE WOLFE 190 ASSEMBLY PLANT.  TAKE OFF-12:10, ENGLISH COAST-14:03, GERMAN COAST-15:04 TARGET-15:30, GERMAN COAST-15:54, BASE-18:44. BOMB LOAD: 6-1000LB GP, FLAK HEAVY

24. OCT. 2, 1944 KASSEL, GERMANY  TAKE OFF-7:55, ENGLISH COAST-9:22, BELGIUM COAST-9:46, TARGET 11:40, BELGIUM COAST-13:58
BASE-15:00.  BOMB LOAD 12-500LB M-17s.  FLAK INTENSE

25. OCT. 5, 1944 HANDORF, GERMANY AIR FIELD.  TAKE OFF-8:05, ENGLISH COAST-10:17, GERMAN COAST-11:04,  RECALL, BASE-13:05
BOMB LOAD 6-1000LB GP, FLAK MEDIUM

26. OCT. 6, 1944 BIG B. BERLIN, GERMANY SPANDAU AIRCRAFT PARTS. TAKE OFF-7:31, ENGLISH COAST-9:03, GERMAN COAST-10:55, TARGET-12:00 GERMAN COAST-13:00, BASE-14:45. FLAK HEAVY AND ACCURATE  BOMB LOAD 6-1000LB GP

27. OCT. 7, 1944 BOHLEN, GERMANY  TAKEOFF-7:25, ENGLISH COAST-9:40, DUTCH COAST-10:27, TARGET-12:23, DUTCH COAST-14:00, BASE-15:20 FLAK VERY HEAVY AND ACCURATE

28. OCT. 9, 1944 MAINZ, GERMANY  MARSHALLING YARDS.  TAKEOFF-11:25, ENGLISH COAST-13:05, ENEMY LINES-14:05, TARGET-15:12
ENEMY LINES-15:42, BASE-17:50.  FLAK VERY LITTLE

29. OCT. 12, 1944 BREMEN, GERMANY FW 190 ENGINE PLANT.  BOMB LOAD 5-1000 GP. TAKE OFF-8:00, ENGLISH COAST-9:57, ENEMY COAST-10:40 TARGET-11:45, ENEMY COAST-12:05, BASE-14:45. FLAK VERY HEAVY.

30. OCT. 22, 1944 MUNSTER, GERMANY MARSHALLING YARDS. BOMB LOAD: 14-250LB GP & 4 M-17. TAKE OFF-10:00, DUTCH COAST-13:36, TARGET-15:25 DUTCH COAST-14:36, BASE-17:00.  FLAK VERY HEAVY

31. OCT. 26, 1944 HANOVER, GERMANY TANK WORKS, BOMB LOAD: 30-260LB GP.  TAKE OFF-10:24, ENEMY COAST-13:16, TARGET-14:30
ENEMY COAST-15:32, BASE-17:10. FLAK HEAVY

32. OCT. 30, 1944 MERSEBURG, GER.  OIL DEPO. 20-250 GP

33. NOVEMBER 16, 1944 AACHEN, GER. FRONT LINES EAST OF AACHEN, GERMANY.  BOMB LOAD 30-260 FRAGS  

Officer Ranks at end of Tour: 
Capt.Fred Schaffhausen-P
1st lt.Victor Koehler-CP
2nd Lt.George Ray-NAV
1st Lt.Ray Vaughn-BOM


Subj: 100thBG Error Report 
Date: 8/18/2001 9:40:16 AM Pacific Daylight Time 
From: sheff@ix.netcom.com (Fred Schaffhausen)To: mpfaley@aol.comCC: janr@cei.net  
The following form contents were entered on 18th Aug 1Date = 18 Aug 1 16:39:49
Fred Schaffhausencomments = Re: 418th Sqdn.,page 10 crew labeled 2nd Lt.Frederick Schaffhausenerrors as follows:Crew last mission list:Correct ranks-
Capt.Fred Schaffhausen
1st lt.Victor Koehler
2nd Lt.George Ray
1st Lt.Ray Vaughnafter 
Sgt.Alex Sood.add-ressigned 3/sept.44Ist paragraph after crews last mission list:Should read"crew assigned to418th sqdn,4/July/ 44 as crew 76.2nd para.: crew flew 5 different aircraft on 10 combat missions,July/44Assigned "OUR BABE' on 3/AUG/44.,PILOTADDED "Hutchie" after "Our Babe"in honor of his wife."Our Babe Hutchie"was destroyed in combat,11/Sept.44.onits 61st mission.Crew was assigned a new B-17G,fresh from the states whichthey named "MISS CONDUCT".IT WAS HEAVELY DAMAGED ON A MISSION. 2/Oct/44.
NOTATION FROM SGT. JOHNIE FORTNER LOG IS IN ERROR.ENLISTED MEN WERE NOT GIVEN DETAILS OF MISSION BEING FLOWN FOR SECURITY REASONS.In formation listed was released to crew,after security restrictions were lifted, by the pilot in a binder named"CREW 76"MAY 92.A COPY WAS SENT TO JAN RIDDLING AND THE THORPE ABBOTTS MUSEUM AT THE SAME TIME.SUGGEST THE MISSION LIST BE LABELED."COMBAT MISSIONS,CREW 76'I have copies of the 418th Sqdn monthly diary report for the months of 7/8/9/10/44.If you would like copies,mail me your home address,I'll mail them to you.I have a web page that contains infoon WW2.It is-http:pweb.netcom.com/~sheffCrew became high Sqdn lead, in group combat formations,14/8/44

Thanks,
Fred Schaffhausen
Pilot/flight commander
Crew 76
418th Sqdn, 100th Bomb Group (H)



  From Fred Schaffhausen web page:  World War II momories
 
 Like all teenagers in the late thirties, Fed was aware that military life loomed soon. He had a choice: either sit back and wait for the draft called and take his chances where he would be assigned, or pick the branch he wished to be in by volunteering. He had an interest in flying. He made his first trip to Hadley Airport with his older brother Joe, who at that time was participating in Sunday afternoon parachute jumps to entertain the locals waiting to take an airplane ride for $3. It was the year 1925 and aviation was relatively new, so it fascinated most people and Sunday air shows were big attractions. His brother spent a lot of his time at the airport. Hadley was the eastern terminal for airmail flights to Cleveland. Charles Lindberg and Jimmy Dolittle were frequent visitors to Hadley, both as Air Mail pilots and as participants in airshows. Both were very friendly and referred to him as Joe's wipper snapper young brother. To his amazement, when he ran into Lindberg at Turner field in December of 43 and was introduced to him by his squadron leader, his first comment was, "Well, well, Joes' little brother made it." 
 
   
 On his 21st birthday, Fred was required to register for the draft. At the same time he filed applications with the USAAF, NAVY, and COAST GUARD, for aviation flight training. He had no particular preference. Whoever would teach him to fly, he would join. Each of them required interviews, testing, evaluation and it seemed to be an endless process. Finally,the USAAF sent him a letter of acceptence in Aug.42, requesting him to go to Trenton to be sworn in as an aviation cadet. One week later he received a letter from the Navy also accepting him. Too late; he was already committed. Secretly he didn't like the idea of flying off a moving airfield anyway. He much preferred one that stayed in one place. USAAF cadet classes were backed up, so he was kept in a reserve status and finally called to active duty in Feb, 43. He reported to the USAAF classification center in Nashville where extensive testing took place for assignment to pilot, bombadier or navigator training. 
 
   
 Within two weeks, his tests showed he was qualified for pilot training, thus he was sent to Maxwell Field, Alabama, for pre-flight school with the class of 43J. Pre-flight School took 3 months and it presented the good and bad sides of being a cadet. Supposedly, in addition to preparing you to commence flight training, it exposed one to leadership, discipline, and humiliation training. The upper and lower classman classification brought out the CS in a minority of the cadets. After a episode of tonsillitis and since Jeanette was graduating from Mary Washington in May, the flight surgeon suggested he have his tonsils removed. He thought it was a good idea. It would give him a two week leave, long enough to go to Jeanette's senior prom and her graduation. 
 
   
 He was assigned to class 43K, and reported to Riddle Field, Arcadia, Fla. for Primary training in a PT-17 bi-plane. Fred made his first flight on June 3rd, it lasted 43 minutes and launched him on a flight oriented career. He had 66.48 hours of flight training at Arcadia. The instructors were civilians. The flight examiners were USAAF Lieutenants. One note worthy incident took place on the night before they were to depart for Bainbridge. A young paddlefoot lieutenant (the name for a non-flying ninety day wonder lieutenant) caught 8 of them playing poker. He punished them buy making them walk to the train station the next morning with full pack, a distance of five miles. 
 
   
 Basic training was at Bainbridge Air Base, Georgia in a BT-13A. This was a new ball game. The instructors were all air force pilots and the aircraft had much more power. It was called the Vultee vibrator, known for its stabilizer stalls that killed many cadets on take offs. It was in this aircraft that he had the most serious experience in flight training. Without any duel flight training on instrument flight, he was scheduled for his first night solo flight. It was pitch black, he didn't tell his instructor he had no instrument training and proceeded to take off on instruments. On reaching an altitude of 3,000 feet he leveled off. He felt pretty proud of himself. He gazed around the cockpit and the instruments looked fine. He looked up, saw the ground, looked down and saw the sky. This was not the way it was supposed to be. Somehow, he turned the aircraft upside down without knowing it. To this day, he does not know how he corrected his mistake and landed safely. On landing his instructor asked him how it went. He answered "FINE, when do I start instrument flight training?" Before leaving Basic, Fred was fully aware of which side of the aircraft was up and how to keep it there. With two legs of training behind them, they moved to Turner Field, in Albany Georgia for advanced training in a twin engine aircraft: the AT-10, made by Beech with bamboo. If It crashed (and some did) it took 30 seconds for it to be consumed by fire. Three months later, they were deemed to be qualified Air Force pilots, gentlemen by an act of congress. Fred authorized to wear his pilot wings on 11/27/43 and commissioned a 2nd Lt. on Dec.5, 1943. The formal graduation took place on Dec.12th. Lindberg was the guest speaker. He congratulated each of the class for successfully completing training. As Fred shook his hand, he whispered to "meet me for dinner at the club at 7." Fred was thrilled; he could hardly wait for 7 to arrive. On entering the club he spotted Lindberg talking to a group of officers, gathered around the base Commanding Officer. Fred stood to the side. When Lindberg caught his eye, he beckoned Fred to join him. He introduced Fred to the officers of the group; the lowest rank was major. Fred as a 2nd Lt. and felt rather sheepish. Lindberg told the Col. Fred was his dinner guest. During dinner he asked Fred where he had been assigned. When he told him he was going to Idaho for B-24 transitional training, Lindberg stated, "you do not want to do that, you want B-17 training." The next morning, the officer of the day called in Fred and told him his orders were changed; he was going to Seabring Florida for B-17 training. Unknown to Fred, Lindberg's fine hand was involved in the change. Total cadet flight time -- 261.45 hours. 
 
   
 After a10 day leave, during which he and Jeanette decided to marry in Sebring on Jan.10th, he returned to Sebring to commence B-17 Transition flight training. He had seen a B-17 up close once before, at a practice field during Primary. He recalled how awed he was at the size of it. At that time it was the largest bomber the USAAF had. The pilot at the time invited them inside to get a good look at it. 
 
   
 On Jan.10th Fred and Jeanette were married at the base chapel, with Chaplain Hastings officiating. It was a full dress military wedding, with crossed sabers and a squadron of B-17s flying over head. On Feb.12, 1944, he received a 1091 rating, qualifying him as a B-17 Air Craft Commander, and proceeded to Plant Park, Florida to pick up his flight crew for combat training at McDill Field, Tampa, Fla. There they were introduced to the combat formation group flying techniques, flying in groups of 36 aircraft. Before the sessions at McDill ended, all the pilots had the ability to fly in formation at speeds up to 225 MPH, wing tips 6 to 12 inches from the aircraft to their left or their right. Since they were being trained to fly saturation bombing missions, close formations at the time of the bomb drop were required. 
 
   
 Fred with his crew left McDill on May 24th, to go to Savannah, Georgia to pick up a B-17 to fly to England. On arriving in Savannah, the were told no aircraft were available and they would proceed to Camp Kilmer, N.J. and be shipped to Fngland by boat. We later found out that the shortage of aircraft in Savannah was the direct result of a speed up in shipments during the prior 3 weeks in anticipation of D-Day. They arrived at camp Kilmer on June 1. At the officers club, Fred's old high school teacher was the bartender in his spare time. He agreed to see Jeanette and tell her where he was and let her know Fred would get overnight passes in a few days, as soon as they completed abandon ship training. Due to D-Day preparations in England, and the activity for the days after D-Day, they did not leave Kilmer until June, 12th. They sailed in a convoy out of NY Harbor that took 8 days to cross. They docked in Liverpool, and took a train to the 8th AF replacement depot in Stone, England. 
 
   
 While waiting for assignment, many rumors were circulated about the various groups where they may be sent. The key place not to be sent to was the 100th Bomb Group, called the Bloody Hundreth. Allegedly it had a bad reputation among the German fighter pilots who looked for the 100th each day. It was easy to locate its tail insignia, which was a big square "D." Assignments were posted in a few days, and Fred's crew was assigned to the Bloody 100th. Needless to say, our crew received plenty of advice and comments, such as, "don't unpack your bags, they'll be shipped home soon," and "Hope we are on the same mission as the 100th, then the fighters will attack them and not us." "Make sure your will is made out," etc. They arrived at the 100th on June 30th, flew some practice missions over England, then on July 17th, Fred was assigned as co-pilot to the Jones crew. This was routine; it gave the new flight commanders a degree of combat experience before they took their crew into combat. It was a milk run. They bombed bridges with no opposition, and no flak. Boy was Fred in for a surprise later. The next day Fred flew with his crew as tail end charlie in the low squadron on a mission to SCHWEINFORT. It was fortified with 1600 88 M flak guns and defended in strength by the German fighters. Over the target area, there was a sea of black fiery smoke from the bursting flak shells. They were hit with numerous shell fragments. The right waist gunner was hit with a piece of metal from an exploding shell that penetrated his upper thigh, the right rear door was blown off, the pilot's windshield was shattered sending Plexiglas fragments into Fred's eyes (In the future he wore protective goggles). The co-pilot took over until he could regain his sight. After return to base, they found 300 penetration holes in the aircraft. The ground crew worked all night and the ship was repaired and ready for the next mission the following day. They flew the next 16 missions flown by the Hundreth and at that rate they would have their 35 missions in by the end of August. At that point Fred was promoted to HIGH SQUADRON LEAD IN GROUP FORMATIONS. This meant that they only flew missions once every fourth or fifth day. A complete report on Fred's crew's combat experience is presented in a book "CREW 76." It is on file with the 100 Bomb Group Assn as well as at the 100th group museum in Thorpe Abbotts, Suffolk England. This is the site from which the 100th flew all its combat missions in World War two. Fred flew his 33rd and last combat mission on Oct. 30, 1944. As a lead crew pilot he and his crew were required to fly 33 missions before returning to the states. 
 
   
 He left the 100th late Nov.44, and was sent back to stone to await transportation back to the States. While at Stone our ground forces ran into some difficulties in Europe and they put a hold on all air crews enroute to the States. Finally, on 12-16, they permitted them to board the Santa Paula ,a Caribbean cruise ship converted to military use for the trip to the USA. Fortunately, Fred was assigned a private cabin, thus the 14 day journey was pleasant. On his return to the states he was assigned as a B-29 flight instructor to southwest airbases. His last active duty assignment was as head of the standardization board at the Jackson Miss. Air Base. He accumulated 1127.05 hours of flight time on active duty, making his last flight in a B-25 at Mcguire Air Base, Fort Dix, N.J., on Oct.30, 1946.
*********************************************************************************************************

Joseph Murphy Walters Sr.   |   Visit Guest Book 
 

Feb. 12, 1923 - Oct. 2, 2010

Joseph Murphy Walters Sr., 87, of Huntsville passed away Saturday. Joe served in the Army Air Corps during World War II where he received the Purple Heart. He retired from NASA after 30 + years after which he became an avid golfer. He was a member of Holy Spirit Catholic Church and a devoted husband, father, and grandfather who will be greatly missed by all.
Survivors include his wife, Claire; 10 children, Joe Walters Jr. and wife, Pat of Huntsville, Mike Walters and wife, Judy of Dickson, Tenn., Tim Walters and wife, Sharon of Jacksonville, Fla., John Walters and wife, Janice of Madison, David Walters and wife, Addie of Birmingham, Tom Walters and wife, Patsy of Montgomery, Sheila Renegar and husband, Neal of Huntsville, Anne Cahalan and husband, Mike of Louisville, Ky., Robert Walters and wife, Shannon of Huntsville, and Carol Walters of Huntsville; 22 grandchildren; and his brother, Samuel Walters of Birmingham.
Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Holy Spirit Catholic Church. The funeral Mass will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the church. Burial will be in Valhalla Memory Gardens. Laughlin Service Funeral Home is assisting the family. 
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Madison County Special Olympics, 2095 Scott Road, Hazel Green, AL 35750.

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ID: 5375