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S/SGT  Daniel J. MADDRA

UNIT: 351st BOMB Sqdn POSITION: TTE
SERIAL #: STATUS: NOC
MACR:

Comments1: RICHMOND, VA

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW:
S/Sgt Daniel J. Maddra:

Date Crew Nbr Mission Nbr Last Name Initial Rank Position Aircraft Nbr Target
3/3/1944 66 122 MADDRA D J S/SGT RWG 231735 BERLIN                            LT BRANNAN CREW
3/4/1944 66 123 MADDRA D J S/SGT RWG 231735 BERLIN                            LT BRANNAN CREW
4/7/1944 68 141 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT RWG 31412 QUACKENBRUCK (SCRB)      LT HELMICK CREW
4/8/1944 68 142 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT RWG 31412 QUACKENBRUCK                 LT HELMICK CREW
5/28/1944 62 124 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 MAGDEBURG                   LT WOLDT
5/29/1944 62 125 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 LEIPZIG                          LT WOLDT
5/30/1944 62 126 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 TROYES                          LT WOLDT
6/4/1944 62 130 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 BOULOGNE(CHG)                LT WOLDT
6/5/1944 62 131 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 BOULOGNE(CHG)                LT WOLDT
6/6/1944 62 132 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 OUISTREHAM                     LT WOLDT
6/6/1944 62  MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 FALAISE                                  LT WOLDT
6/6/1944 62  MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 BOULOGNE                              LT WOLDT
6/8/1944 62 -136 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 38047 TOURS (BRIDGES)                LT WOLDT
6/11/1944 62 -137 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 BERCK SUR MER (S.DEF)    LT WOLDT
6/14/1944 62 -139 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 LE CULOT (AIR FIELD)       LT WOLDT
6/18/1944 59 -141 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 BRUNSBUTTELKOOG         LT WOLDT
7/7/1944 59 155 MADDRA D.J. S/SGT TOG 107007 BOHLEN/MERSEBURG           LT WOLDT

CREW

2ND LT CARROLL W. WOLDT         P CPT 11 JUL 44 MUINICH (AERO ENGINES)       sn: 0-691553                                      
2ND LT KENNETH H. KNOWLTON CP CPT 02 OCT 44 KASSEL, (AERO ENGINES)      sn: 0-815924
2ND LT JOHN R. TOWNSEND    NAV CPT 17 JUL 44 MONTGOURNOY (NOBALL)       sn: 0-704100
2ND LT RAYMOND D. ROSSMAN BOM POW 28 MAY 44 GERA, CITY & MAGDEBURG,  sn: 0-744337   (WITH L.G. LACY CREW) 
S/SGT JAMES C. ARNOLD          TTE CPT                                                            sn: 38307499
S/SGT DONALD A. SACHS         ROG CPT                                                            sn: 12127205
SGT EDWARD J. FOULDS           BTG CPT See below.…                                         sn: 11094472
SGT RALPH N, NORMAN             WG CPT                                                            sn: 34721710
SGT ALLEN G. LANGHOFF          WG CPT                                                             sn: 36806991
SGT JOSEPH J. SELVENIS           TG CPT                                                             sn: 31281435

351ST SQDN.. CREW, AS ABOVE, JOINED THE 100TH ON 17 MAR 1944

S/Sgt D.J. MADDRA FLEW AS TOG ON THIS CREW FROM MAY 28-JULY 7, 1944.  

SEE "MIGHTY EIGHTH WAR DIARY" page 252 FOR STORY OF ED FOULDS BAILING OUT OVER ENGLAND IN ORDER TO PREVENT THE PLANE FROM HAVING TO ABORT MISSION OF 27 MAY 1944 (STRASSBOURG, AERO ENGINES)
 
 This crew flew aircraft 107007  "SHE-HASTA" for some twenty-six  of their missions. History has assigned the "Runaway Gun" incident of July 11, 1944 that killed BTG S/Sgt Homer Parish to this B-17.  This is in error, Lt. Woldt reports flying 107007 on the July 11, 1944 Munich misson and his aircrapft suffering damage to it's main gear struts from the 50 cal fire from  a neighboring plane. This mix up was most probably caused by an error on the 11 Jul 44 Crew Roster, where Lt Woldt is shown as flying aircraft 97128, a number that I find no matching 100th aircraft for-- Lt Ricci is erroneously listed as flying 107007-- Likely he flew aircraft #42-31256 "King Bee."   It was with the Ricci crew that S/Sgt Parish flew on 11 Jul 1944 and was Killed by the runaway ball turret's 50 Cal. The error is  confirmed by  Mr. Woldt and members if his crew from personal records as well as their memory of the incident…pw


S/Sgt Edward J. Foulds: (From The Might Eighth War Diary       
 
 Aborting - the general term for abandoning an operational flight because of mechanical or personnel failure - was something no crew wanted to be involved in. Once keyed for a mission, the majority of combat crews wished to see it through as another wished to see it through as another to be struck off the statutory 25, 30 or 35 in a tour. The authorities demanded a valid reason for a turn-back. However obvious the justification, there was always a slight stigma about having to abort; the thought that other airmen might be suspicious that the failure was engineered. There were few crews who did not have to abort a mission at one time or another for very good reasons and, while they may have occurred, the "fixed" aborts were few. Early returns also meant fewer bombs on the target and a group with poor maintenance and a high record of number of aborts was soon under scrutiny by high command. So, for both personal and operational reasons, a decision to turn back was never lightly taken. The lengths that some men would go to avoid and abort is well illustrated by an incident on 27 May 1944 when the 100th Group was assembling for a raid on Strasboug. While high over England the oxygen supply lines to the right waist and ball turret fractured on B-17  #107007. The waist gunner could be "plugged" in to the other side of the fuselage and also make use of the emergency oxygen bottles, but these could not be taken to the ball turret. The situation was assessed and it was established there would be insufficient emergency oxygen to supply the two men all the way to the target and back. 1/st Lt Carrol Woldt found he had no option but to abort and informed the crew. S/Sgt Edward Foulds then suggested he should bale out as this would ensure sufficient oxygen for the right waist gunner and any likely emergencies. After some discussion Woldt was persuaded to give permission. Two other gunners held open the fuselage door while Foulds jumped. A safe landing was made and Foulds returned to base while his comrades flew on the target.


Meet Your Neighbor
by Nanette Fodell
Staff Writer Plano Star Courier

Tuesday May 10, 1988

 The Bloody Hundredth: Though the infamous bomber group from WW II has been written abut and immortalized with monuments and movies, as the years go on, fewer of us can tell you exactly what the legendary group was.
 Two Planoites know firsthand, Charles M. Beck and Carroll Woldt were members of the 351st Squadron of the 100th Bombardment Group, known as the Bloody Hundredth. The group got its name in an incident that has left the members with an "ill-fated" and "ill-famed" reputation. Charlie Beck explains:
 "in the air, the sign of surrender was to put down your landing gear. It was like a white flag. Now the Germans -- especially members of the Luftwaffe -- were gentleman soldiers. I mean, if a plane was down in enemy territory, they'd salute your officers and all that. Anyway,  one of our bombers signaled that it was in trouble by lowering its gear. Two German fighters came up to escort the plane to a safe landing, and out bomber shot them down.

 "From them on, they were looking for us and sometimes they found us. They'd pass up other bombers, looking for the insignia of the Bloody Hundredth."
 Another legend has -- of 36 planes in a formation on a raid to Berlin -- only one, the Rosie returning. (This is a major error by the Ms Nanette Fodell -- not to uncommon among journalists)  Nearly 800 men were lost from the 100th Bomber Group and many B-17's, the "Flying Fortress."
 Until recently, Woldt and Beck had not idea they had a "brother" from the 100th so close. Virtual neighbors in Plano, the two were stationed at the Thorpe Abbotts base on the North Sea Coast in England within six months of each other.

 Each man was drafted and each ended up in the Army Air Force, Woldt was a pilot, and Beck was a radio/gunner, which meat he sent back signals to the base as to whether his squadron had hit the target. He also operated the guns that stuck out the side of the airplane.
 The squadron flew in wings of possibly 2,000 planes per strike, often hitting enemy targets several times a week. The Americans raided during the day; the English took night duty. Each time the planes went up. Lives were on the line. Oddly, though, Woldt and Beck agree that death never entered their minds. "I sure didn't think about it the way I do now," Woldt said. "Possibly it was our youth. And some of it was the Army training. They kept you motivated and thinking of other things."
 "Wonder if was something they put in our food back then?" Beck wondered. "I remember walking out on a catwalk (of a bomber), no parachute or anything. If the bombs stuck, I'd have to go out there and kick them onto the target. I didn't think about death then. But I was nineteen, and was thinking about having fun.

 "I always knew I was coming home. Didn't you?" said Wodlt to Beck. Going home was constantly on their minds at Thorpe Abbotts, said the men. Woldt's plane was named "She Has Ta" by his men. That meant She Has to Get Back," he said.
 Beck flew on Mason & Dixon, a battered B-17 that was eventually scrapped for a newer plane. After completing 35 missions, a tour of duty at Thorpe Abbotts was complete. Beck came back to the states after six months and went to work for Collins Radio Company (based in Richardson, Texas), which was later bought by Rockwell International. Woldt stayed in Paris for the remainder of the war, where he was a pilot for Army Generals. Upon his return to the states, he worked at several jobs until he established himself here in the building industry during the '50s.

 Now, more that 40 years later, the tower at Thorpe Abbotts has been made into a museum by Englishmen, in appreciation of the American effort. Woldt is the liaison for the museum in the United States. Through family connections, Woldt recently found Beck, and the two have spent many hours reminiscing since. Both men are retired and have time to reflex on their experiences and how different they are from the generations that came after them.
 "We've discussed it, and we both agree that we wish young people of today could gain the same appreciation for freedom that we have without having to go through what we went through," said Beck

Missions of Lt C.W. Woldt (mpf)

27/03/44  Chateaudeun/Evreux   Flew as CP to get orientated
31/03/44  Ludwigshafen   Recalled
01/04/44  Ludwigshafen   Recalled
09/04/44  Krzesinki (Poznan)
10/04/44  Rheims/Champagne
11/04/44  Poznan, Poland  
12/04/44  Scheuditz   Recall
13/04/44  Augsburg
01/05/44  Saasrguemines/Wizernes 
11/05/44  Liege
12/05/44  Brux    Oil Refinery
13/05/44  Osnabruck
19/05/44  BERLIN
24/05/44  BERLIN
25/05/44  Brussels
27/05/44  Strasbourg
28/05/44  Magdeburg  S/Sgt Maddra takes over as Tog
29/05/44  Leipzig
30/05/44  Troyes
02/06/44  Boulogne
04/06/44  Boulogne
05/06/44  Abbeyville/Boulogne
06/06/44  Quistreham-  D-Day
06/06/44      Falaise-D-Day
08/06/44  Tours (Bridges)
11/06/44  Berck sur Mer
14/06/44  LeCulot   Air Field
18/06/44  Brunsbutterkoog
07/07/44  BohlenMerseburg- S/Sgt Maddra's last misison with this crew as Tog
08/07/44  Clamecy-Jolgyn
11/07/44  Munich    Aeroengines

MEMO 2:

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: DATE:  
AIRCRAFT: CAUSE:  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  
ID: 3264