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CAPT  Douglas S. EDEN

UNIT: 350th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: BOM

Capt Douglas Eden, Lead Bombardier 350th Bomb Squadron. Was original Bombardier on Lt MacNab Crew

Capt Douglas Eden, Lead Bombardier 350th Bomb Squadron. Was original Bombardier on Lt MacNab Crew. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Escape and Evasion photo of Lt Douglas Eden, Bombardier on Lt Macnab Crew.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

SERIAL #: O-1997861 STATUS: FEH
MACR:

Comments1: MACNAB CREW, 350 BS LEAD BOMBARDIER

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW
DATE: 31 December 1944                  350th Sqdn.         A/C #43-38457 "NINE LIVES"

MISSION: Hamburg                             MACR #11359      Microfiche 4180

1st Lt William G.MacNab             P     KIA    31 DEC 44 HAMBURG
2nd Lt Nelson B.Vaughan          CP    KIA    31 DEC 44 HAMBURG
2nd Lt Charles J. Scott           NAV   FEH   moved up to Lead NAV (Flying at end of hostilities.)
F/O     Douglas S. Eden          BOM   FEH  moved up to Lead BOM (Flying at end of hostilities)  SN# O-1997861
2nd Lt Jack Berkowitz             NAV   POW   31 DEC 44 HAMBURG   From C.W. Wilson crew     SN# O-777438
2nd Lt Raymond E.Comer, Jr.  BOM   POW   31 DEC 44 HAMBURG  From C.W. Wilson crew
 T/Sgt Henry S.Ethridge         ROG   KIA    31 DEC 44 HAMBURG
 T/Sgt Joseph A.Chadwick      TTE   POW  31 DEC 44 HAMBURG
 S/Sgt Edward L.Woodall,Jr.    BTG   POW  31 DEC 44 HAMBURG
 S/Sgt Duane F.Rench            WG    KIA    31 DEC 44 HAMBURG
 Cpl Leno R. Delmolino            WG  Taken off Crew to reduce to nine men. 
 S/Sgt Francis J.Seyfried         TG    KIA    31 DEC 44 HAMBURG

350th Sqdn.    Joined 100th on 26 AUG 1944. 
Just found MacNab's crew's orders for movement. They were "Shipment 
FD-900-AJ, as crew FD-900-AJ-69, and to plane 44-8264, on aircraft project 92805-R."  
After they dropped off this aircraft in Wales, it was assigned to the 305th BG, 366 Bomb Squadron at Chelveston, on 8/27/44.  it was shot down by enemy aircraft on Jan 1, 1945 with Lt Osbourne Crew.  3 KIA, 7POW.  Plane crashed near Boedexen, Germany…mpf 2006 

L.R. DeLmolino (original WG) grounded because of change from 10 to 9 men crew and no need at the time for "spare" gunners.  Became a Intelligence Specialists in the 351st. Charles J.Scott and Douglas S. Eden were replaced for the 31 Dec 1944 Hamburg mission by Jack Berkowitz and Raymond E. Comer, both from the Hong Kong Wilson crew and both became POWs. Scott and Eden moved up to Lead Navigator and Lead Bombardier after the crew's 16th mission and were flying at the end of hostilities.

EYEWITNESS: "At 1250 hours,19,000 feet,2 B-17's believed to be A/C 43-38457 and
             A/C 42-31987 pancaked together,circled and crashed,still attached to
             each other.Six chutes were seen before the A/C landed,most of them are
             believed to have fallen on land.There was no fire from the A/C in the
             air or on the ground although there was some smoke."

p.91/92 of CONTRAILS gives U8 a bit more graphic picture.  "Lt.W.MacNab was leading
the "C" Squadron low flight. Lt.G.Rojohn flew behind and high.In the fierce aerial
struggle,both MacNab and his co-pilot,Lt.N.Vaughan,had been wounded.Their ship rose
periously toward Rojohn's,who had moved in after Webster had been downed. A collision
seemed unavoidable.
There was a sickening thud as the planes made contact.They shuddered and locked, headed
out over the North Sea.The engines of MacNab's lower plane were smoking. Rojohn and his
co-pilot,Lt.W.Leek,immediately cut their engine switches,avoiding a probable
explosion.
The situation was something too fantastic for even Hollywood to simulate.The two planes
clung together as Rojohn and Leek battled the controls,and by sheer strength,managed
to slowly turn the eight enginied monstrosity toward land.
T/Sgt Chadwick bailed out while ths planes were still over water,but his chute fortun-
ately did not collapse,and he was washed ashose . . . S/Sgt. E.Woodall,also from MacNab's
ship ,landed in water and managed to reach shore. . . . . Chadwick was taken into
custody that night,together with navigator J.Berkwitz,bombardier R. Comer and Woodall.

Seven men,T/Sgt.O.Elkin,T/Sgt.E.Neuhaus,Sgt.J.Shirley,S/Sgts.J.Russo,R.Little,F.Chase,
and Lt.R.Washington bailed out of Rojohn's ship. . . . The fate of Russo,Little and
Chase was unknown

Rojohn and Leek continued to fight the controls,using the engines of the lower aircraft,
and rode the grafted bird in for a landing. There have been amazing stunts pulled in 
the colorful and courageous history of mans will to fly, from the days of Daedalus and Da Vinci 
to the days of the brother Wright and Billy Mitchell,but none more strangely heroic than the day Rojohn and Lesk safely
crash-landed their two planes pick-a-back on a field in North Germany."


MISSIONS OF CAPT. DOUGLAS S. EDEN (Squadron Bombardier. 350TH BS)

1.     25/09/44   LUDWIGSHAVEN   A/C 338011   The Reluctant Dragon
2.     26/09/44   BREMEN               A/C 2102598 Super Rabbit
3.     27/09/44   MAINZ                 A/C 231991   Miss Chief
4.     28/09/44   MERSEBURG         A/C 2102958  LN-G
5.       2/10/44   KASSEL
6.       3/10/44   NURNBURG
7.       5/10/44   HANDORF
8.       6/10/44   BERLIN
9.       9/10/44   MAINZ
10.    15/10/44  COLOGNE
11.    17/10/44  COLOGNE
12.    18/10/44  KASSEL
13.    22/10/44  MUNSTER
14.    26/10/44  HANOVER
15.      5/11/44  LUDWIGSHAVEN
16.    10/11/44  MAINZ (last mission flown with Macnab Crew, went to lead crew training)
17.    24/12/44  BIBLIS
18.    25/12/44  KAISERLAUTERN (First Lead Crew Mission)
19.    31/12/44  HAMBURG 
20.      6/01/45  ANNWEILER
21.    10/01/45  COLOGNE
22.    14/01/45  DERBEN
23.    28/01/45  DUISBURG
24.    21/02/45  NURNBURG
25.    24/03/45  STEENWIJK
26.      9/04/45  MUNICH
27.    10/04/45  BURG-bei-MAGDEBURG
28.    17/04/45  AUSSIG

CHOWHOUND MISSIONS
[1] May 2, ’45 – Amsterdam (food) Led Group (hit)
[2] May 3, ’45 – Alknaar, Holland (food) Led Wing (hit)
[3] May 5, ’45 – Alknaar, Holland (food) element lead (hit)
[4] May 7, ’45 – Amsterdam, Holland (food) element lead (hit)


---> SUBMITTER INFORMATION
SUBMITTER: Elizabeth A Eden-Maguire
EMAIL: edenmagu@hotmail.com
PURPOSE: Report a website error
INTEREST: I am the veteran's child: 
TELEPHONE NUMBER: 503-492-2213

---> MESSAGE
Message:  My father is Douglas S. Eden, Maj (retired), USAF. He served as a bombadier under 1st Lt Wm G MacNab. You report my dad as moving to "Lead Nav" which is incorrect; he was moved to "Lead Bombadier." Also, you report his 18th mission on Kaiserslautern as being on 12/28/1944, which is incorrect. According to several sources, including your Missions database, that mission was sent out on 12/25/44.

When I was in my mid-teens, the USAF sent my family to Germany (Sembach AFB near Kaiserslautern, as a matter of fact). We lived off-base in Enkenbach for a time, and I remember a conversation between my Dad and our German landlady. She was remembering the bombs dropping over she and her family on Christmas Day, 1944. As a teen, I barely recognized my dad's back stiffen or his color change. It was only later when he told me that only one "raid" had been sent out that Christmas Day way back in 1944--and he'd been the lead bombadier. Although I was a teenager, I recognized the implications immediately--if he hadn't actually dropped those bombs on her, he'd ordered them dropped.

I've never forgotten that conversation--two former "enemies" meeting face to face…and finding out we're all just people. I learned some things myself that day.

War is sometimes necessary. But war is never pretty, and there is sometimes no way to avoid innocents getting in the way.

Appreciating what the 100th Bomb Group did for our freedom,
Beth Eden-Maguire


Douglas Scott Eden
Lieutenant United States Army Air Force
Assigned to "Crew #5694", MacNab's crew, dated 18 May, 1944. 
They met and flew together from Ardmore, Oklahoma until Lt Eden
headed for lead bombardier school in November 44.
For the record, Lt Eden's birthday is 22 Apr 1923. He was "19 4/12" years old at 
the time he enlisted.

Sept. 8, ’42 - Enlisted in Portland, Oregon.
Mar. 26, ’43 - Reported in at San Francisco, California.
Mar. 29, ’43 - Sheppard Field, Wichita Falls, Texas. 301 Training Group Barracks 307 (Capt. Smith)
Apr. 18, ’43 - Left Texas
Apr. 21, ’43 - University of Minneapolis, Mpls, Minn. 88th C.T.D. Room 25 (Maj. Sheldon)
July 24, ’43 - Left Minneapolis, Minn.
July 28, ’43 - Santa Ana, California. 20 Classification Squad. Barracks C (Capt. Smith).
Aug. 14, ’43 - Classified bombardier.
Aug. 15, ’43 - Appointed Aviation Cadet.
Aug. 18, ’43 - Began Pre-flight Squad. 92 Barracks A (Capt. Davies)
Oct. 27, ’43 - Left Santa Ana, California
Oct. 28, ’43 - Las Vegas, Nevada, Squad. 6 Tent 10 (Lt. Ball)
Nov. 1, ’43 -  Began Gunnery training
Dec. 13, ’43 - Graduated
[delay en-route, 8 days]
Dec. 24, ’43 - Kirtland Field, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 324 B.T.Sq’d. Class 44-6 Bar. T. 406 (Lt. Tetterington)
Dec. 27, ’43 - Began advanced
Apr. 29, ’44 - Graduated
[delay en-route, 8 days]
May 12, ’44 - Lincoln, Nebraska, 2nd AAF C&RP Sq’d A (Capt. Wright)
May 17, ’44 - Left Lincoln, Nebraska
May 18, 44-Assigned Crew #5694, 2nd Lt MacNab's Crew
May 19, ’44 - Ardmore, Oklahoma, 222 CCTD GP II Sq’d 8 (Maj Angiers)
July 25, ’44 - Left Ardmore, Oklahoma
[delay en-route, 8 days]
Aug. 5, ’44 - Kearney, Nebraska
Aug. 15, ’44 - Left Kearney, Nebraska. Arrived: Grenier Field, Manchester, N.H.
Aug. 16, ’44 - Left the United States.
Aug. 16, ’44 - Goose Bay, Labrador.
Aug. 18, ’44 - Meeks Field, Iceland.
Aug. 19, ’44 - Arrived Valley (Holyhead) Wales.
Aug. 20, ’44 - Left Valley, Wales. Arrived 8th A.F. Replacement Depot (near Stone & Hanley)
Aug. 24, ’44 - Left 8th A. F. R.&R. Depot Arrived Diss.Thorpe Abbotts 100th Bomb Group 350th Squadron. 13 Combat Wing, 3rd Division.

MISSIONS:
(1) Sept. 25, ’44 - Ludwigshafen, Germany (mar. y’d.)
(2) Sept. 26, ’44 - Bremen, Germany (F. W. Aircraft plant)
(3) Sept. 27, ’44 - Mainz, Germany (mar. y’d.)
(4) Sept. 28, ’44 - Merseburg, Germany (oil)
(5) Oct. 2, ’44 - Kassel, Germany (tank factory)
(6) Oct. 3, ’44 - Ludwigsburg, Germany (airfield)
(7) Oct. 5, ’44 - Munster, Germany (airfield) (Handorf)*
(8) Oct. 5, ’44 - Berlin, Germany (engine factory)
(9) Oct. 9, ’44 - Weisbaden, Germany (ordanance) (Mainz)*
(10) Oct. 15, ’44 - Cologne, Germany (mar yd.)
(11) Oct. 17, ’44 - Cologne, Germany (mar yd.)
(12) Oct. 18, ’44 - Kassel, Germany (tank factory)
       Oct  20, ’44 - Awarded Air Medal. (dated 9 Oct)
(13) Oct. 22, ’44 - Munster, Germany (mar y’d)
(14) Oct. 26, ’44 - Hannover, Germany (mar. y’d.).
       Nov  1  '44 - LEAD BOMBARDIER
(15) Nov. 5, ’44 - Ludwigshafen, Germany (chemical)  -SEE LETTER "SOMEWHERE IN ENGLAND" FOR STORY OF THIS MISSION
(16) Nov. 10, ’44 - Weisbaden, Germany (airfield) (Mainz)*
       Nov. 27, ’44 - Commissioned 2nd Lt.
(17) Dec. 24, ’44 - Biblis, Germany (airfield)
(18) Dec. 25, ’44 - Kaiserslautern, Ger. (mar yd) Led C (hit)
(19) Dec. 31, ’44 - Hamburg, Germany (mar yd) Led B (missed)
       Jan.   3, ’45 - Appointed Squadron Bombardier.
(20) Jan.   6, ’45 - Anwieler, Ger. (T.O.) Led GP (began as B) (hit)
(21) Jan. 10, ’45 -  (Koln)* Duisburg, Ger. (T.O.) Led Group (C& M to Koln) (hit)
(22) Jan. 14, ’45 - Derben, Ger. (underground oil) Led Group (hit)
(23) Jan. 28, ’45 - Duisburg, Ger. (RR bridge) Led Wing (hit)
       Feb.   5, ’45 - Appointed 1st Lt.
       Feb.   9, ’45 - Flak leave. Bournemouth, England [Rest leave, 8 days]
       Feb. 10, ’45 - Received 1st Lt.
(24) Feb. 21, ’45 - Nurnberg, Germany (mar y’d) Led Wing (P.F.F.) (hit)
       Mar. 22. ’45 - Orders for Captaincy.
       Mar. 24, ’45 - Received Captaincy.
(25) Mar. 24, ’45 - Steenwijk, Holland (airfield) Led C (hit)
(26) Apr.   9, ’45 - Munich, Austria (airfield) Led C (hit)
(27) Apr. 10, ’45 -BURG-bei-MAGDEBURG Germany (airfield) Led B (hit)
(28) Apr. 17  ’45 - Aussig, Czechslovakia (mar. y’d.) Led B (hit)

CHOWHOUND MISSIONS:
[1] May 2, ’45 – Amsterdam (food) Led Group (hit)
[2] May 3, ’45 – Alkmaar, Holland (food) Led Wing (hit)
[3] May 5, ’45 – Alkmaar, Holland (food) element lead (hit)
[4] May 7, ’45 – Amsterdam, Holland (food) element lead (hit)
May 8, ’45 – V.E. day

POST HOSTILITIES:
June 14, ’45 – Casablanca (3 day trip)
July 4, ’45 – Transferred to 95th Bomb Group 335th Sqd.
July 10, ’45 – Stone 70th Replacement Depot, 130th Reinforcement BN 156th Reinforcement Co
July 29, ’45 – Greenoch, Scotland. Sailed "John Harvard."
Aug. 10, ’45 – Boston, Camp Myles Standish. Taunton
Aug. 11, ’45 – Left Myles Standish
Aug. 14, ’45 – "VJ" Day (Aberdeen, South Dakota
Aug. 16, ’45 – Arrived Fort Lewis, Tocoma, Wash.
Aug. 16, ’45 – Left Fort Lewis.
Aug. 17, ’45 – Home
Sept. 18, ’45 – Reported at Santa Ana, Calif
Oct. 19, ’45 – Discharged at Santa Ana
Dec. 3, ’45 – End of terminal leave.


"In the mid-60s, my dad was stationed at Sembach AFB in Germany, and I 
attended Kaiserslautern American High School for two years. We lived on the 
economy for about a year and a half and then moved on base.

During our time on the economy, our German landlady and Dad were talking. 
Our conversations with Frau Behr were always interesting because of language 
difficulties but she clearly described Christmas Day of 1944 and the bombs 
dropping outside as she huddled with her sister. Dad acknowledged her 
memories but did not say much more. After Frau Behr, Dad told me he had been 
lead bombardier on the only mission sent out over Kaiserslautern on 25 
December 1944. This might be a 30 year old memory but it made a big impact 
on me to have witnessed this particular conversation between my dad and our 
landlady.

Dad's written records confirm this statement made to me many years ago. His 
first lead mission was 25 December 1944, not 31 December 1944.

Dad was in the air on 31 December. I know it was a bad day--in fact, 31 
December is the only day my dad reports a "miss." All his other lead 
missions were "hits." So far he has related looking to the left and seeing 
the closest B-17 go down, he looked to the right and saw that B-17 go down. 
I can see we are approaching the painful and he is avoiding but your 
objective approach, "Describe what you saw…", will get us there if I am 
patient"….Beth Eden-Maguire -june 2006

MEDALS AND RIBBONS:

Army Air Force
Honorable Discharge
Aviation Cadet Douglas S. Eden, 19136007
Hq & Hq Sq., 324th Bmbr Tng Sq.
28 April 1944
Covers period of active duty 3-29-43 to 4-28-1944
"Decorations, service medals, citations" Good Conduct Medal
--------------------------------------------------------
Army of United States
Certificate of Service
Douglas Scott Eden, Flight Officer, T3758
350th Bombardment Squadron, 100th Bombardment Group (H) AAF
"honorably served in active Federal Service in the Army of the United States 
from 29 April 1944 to 26 November 44"
"Military Record

Awarded the Air Medal, GO 793, 3d Bomb Div, 9 October 1944. Awarded 1st Oak 
Leaf Cluster to the Air Medal, GO 878, 3d Bomb Div 24 Oct 44.
Authorized to wear the European Theatre of Operations Ribbon."
-------------------------------------
Army of the United States
Certificate of Service
Capt Douglas S Eden 0-1997861 Air Corps
350th Bombardment Squadron, 100th Bombardment Group (H) AAF
3 December 1945
"honorably served in active Federal Service in the Army of the United States 
from 27 November 1944 to 3 December 1945."

"Decorations and Citations: I found the original orders for medals and OLCs.
October 9, 1944        Air Medal           (Awarded the Air Medal, GO 793, 3d Bomb Div, 9 October 1944.
October 24, 1944      Oak Leaf Cluster (Awarded 1st Oak Leaf Cluster to the Air Medal, GO 878, 3d Bomb Div 24 Oct 44.)
December 31, 1944   Oak Leaf Cluster
February 27, 1945     Oak Leaf Cluster
May 28, 1945           Oak Leaf Cluster   (4th OLC to Air Medal GO 304 Hq 3AD 2-27-45)
May 8, 1945             Distinguished Flying Cross    ( DFC GO 967 Hq 3AD 5-8-45)
The DFC was awarded for Kaiserslautern on 25 December 1944 (there it is again!); Munich on 9 April 1945; and Berg on 10 April 1945 "despite adverse weather conditions and anti-aircraft fire on each mission."

EAME Ribbon w/4 Bronze Battle Stars WD Cir 195/44"
-Northern France (25 July 1944 - 14 September 1944) 
-Rhineland (15 September 1944 - 21 March 1945) 
-Ardennes - Alsace (16 December 1944 - 25 January 1945) 
-Central Europe (22 March 1945 - 11 May 1945 

Beth
______________________________________________________________________

NOT FOR PUBLICATION:

>            Somewhere in England
>
>                                                                     Nov. 8, 1944
>Dear Mother:
>
>      It happened on the bomb run.  After flying hundreds of miles over a
>thick undercast, the target area appeared, below and ahead, completely
>unobscured by clouds.  It looked as though someone had taken a pair of
>scissors and snipped a round hole out of the fleecy blanket and by chance,
>---over the target.  Ahead lay clearly the town, the chemical plant, the
>river and marshalling yards.  Although experts at camouflage, the Germans
>could not disguise nature’s tell-tale land land marks which pointed to the
>objective.
>
>      The heavy bombers fanned out and started the bombing run.  After 
>flying several minutes over the seemingly peaceful country side and city below, 
>the flak barrage was unleashed.  Usually the first squadron over a target
>encounters little flak because the gun crews below are busily computing the
>altitude and count of the bombers.  This was an exception, - the kind you
>run up against so often in this war.  The first bursts of flak came up and
>were exceedingly accurate.  This meant that the range and course were
>already correctly computed, and without moving his guns, Jerry could 
>plaster the rest of the division as easily, but not quite as effectively as they
>could hammer him.
>
>      Ship 437 was leading the high flight of the lead squadron.  The pilot
>held the ship level and all aboard were anxiously awaiting the cry of 
>"bombs away."  A direct hit in the bomb bays would blow any plane to bits, and 
>with the doors open, flak bursting about and no chance for evasive actions, nine
>men breathed a sigh of relief when over the interphone the bombardier said
>sharply "bombs away."  In that brief moment the unexpected happened: flak
>fragments began riddling the skin of the ship; a piece tore through the
>cockpit severing the pilots oxygen line and hitting him in the leg, and
>finally stopped against his inner heated suit.  The bomb bay doors refused
>to close, an amplifier went out in number one engine and number three
>received several good hits in the cowling.  While the pilot and co-pilot
>feathered the propellor of the now dead number one engine, the bombardier
>crawled back to the bomb bays to crank the doors up by hand since the
>electrical system was out of operation.  As the engineer crawled out of his
>upper turret to assist the bombardier and fix the pilots oxygen system, a
>flak fragment came through the front of the turret where his face would
>ordinarily have been.  The piece of flying steel was so hot that it lit in
>his ammunition cans amidst a shower of glass, and melted the ends of five
>rounds of 50 caliber machine gun bullets to shapeless gobs of molten lead
>and steel.
>
>      Unable to keep up with the formation, the pilot dropped altitude and
>air speed and tried to catch another group.  A straggler falls easy prey to
>enemy fighters.  While the bombardier was still standing on the catwalk,
>25000 feet over Germany, with the temperature nearly 40 degrees F below
>zero, and an oxygen bottle, one end on his mask and the other flopping
>around in the slip stream, and only hanging on to a small rope used as a
>railing, with no parachute, the pilot dropped the nose of the plane to 
>avoid hitting another bomber coming in from 9 o’clock.  At such a dizzy altitude
>it appeared for a brief moment he would go hurtling out of the wallowing
>ship.
>
>      Meanwhile, up in the cockpit the instruments were denoting radical
>changes.  Flak had put Number one out and Number three engine was leaking
>gas and oil badly, and smoke was billowing out from under the cowl flaps.
>Too, one of the aileron controls had been knocked out.  On the pilot rested
>the problem – is the engine seriously on fire?—is it behind the firewall? –
>if so, it would explode at any moment.  Should he tell the crew to bail 
>out, or take a chance and fly her back?  Could he make the base in England, or
>must he set her down in France or Belgium.  Taking a chance, he chose to 
>fly home.
>
>      The flak bursts had increased in their number during the bomb run, 
>and for a period shortly after "bombs away" the flak had been so close the red
>bursts were as noticeable as the black puffs.  Several times the plane was
>lifted by near misses exploding under her vulnerable fuselage.  A barrage 
>of 6 – 10 bursts would appear suddenly ahead and just short of the nose; the
>next moment the plane was flying through the remnants of the smoke.  About
>were exploding rockets and vapor trails left by friendly patrolling 
>fighters waiting outside the flak area to escort the bombers home.
>
>      Several hours later 437 sighted the English Coast and prepared to 
>head towards its field, when an order came through to land at an alternate base.
>The home field was closed due to a terrific cross wind and rain showers.
>Wearily, the old lady lowered her nose and the pilot began the
>difficult struggle to set her sown on a strange field with a treacherous
>tail wind, one engine out and another likely to quit at any moment, and 
>part of the controls shot away.
>
>      He set her down, and as she came to a rest, engine number three burst
>in flames, but they were quickly extinguished.  Despite great battle 
>damage, 44 flak holes, so seriously injured as to warrant not flying for several
>days, and battered sister ships, - 437 came through and her crew escaped
>serous injury in their 15th mission over the Reich.
>
>      I received my information first hand – I was the bombardier.
>
>
>   Love
>
>
>          Doug. (EDEN, BOMB ON MACNAB CREW)

Sent by his Daughter Beth.  The mission was to Ludwigshaven, Nov 5, 1944, target, Chemical Factory

Obit: Douglas S. Eden, 89, died Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, in Texas State Veterans Clinic in McAllen. Heavenly Grace Funeral Home and Crematory is in charge of funeral arrangements.

************************************************************************************

In January 1945 Lt David Raiford received all the enlisted men from Lt Charlie "Hong Kong" Wilson’s Crew. This crew would eventually become a Lead crew consisting at different times of the crew listing below; Sgt Hoffpauir transferred to the 15th Air Force when they changed over to a lead crew and Sgt Jay Kendell moved from BTG to Waist Gunner. 

Lt RaifordsLead Crew after Jan 1945: 

Lt David G. Raiford             Lead Pilot
Lt Robert Wendling           Co-Pilot/Formation Officer
Capt Ross Chenney            Lead Navigator (from original crew of Lt Armstrong)
2nd Lt Charles J. Scott       moved up to Lead NAV (FEH) (from original crew of Lt McNab)
1st Lt Douglas S. Eden       moved up to Lead BOM (FEH) (from original crew of Lt McNab)          sn# 0-1997861
1st Lt Paul R.Ruth,Jr.          Lead Bombardier (from original crew of Lt Fellows)
2nd Lt Harry Tennenbaum   Mickey Operator (from Lt Shaddix original Crew)
1st Lt Earl Frye                   Radar/Nav          (flew with Lt Seamans lead crew and Assigned Group Radar Officer on 8 Apr 1945)                   
2nd Lt James  M. Pivonka     Mickey Operator (from Lt Dawson Crew)
ENLISTED MEN ARE FROM LT CHARLES "HONG KONG" WILSON'S CREW.ASSIGNED TO LT RAIFORD BEGINNING OF JAN 1945. 
T/Sgt  EMERY N. CASTLE      ROG FEH                                                                                sn# 37523614
T/Sgt  NORMAN G. NANCE     TTE FEH                                                                                sn# 19171578
Sgt   JAY D. KENDELL           BTG FEH moved to WG when became Lead Crew                        sn# 39908662
Sgt   GEORGE L. PESLER        WG CPT 24 MAR 45 STEENEIJK/ ZIEGENHAINE                         sn# 35051164
Sgt   ARCHIE E. HOFFPAUIR    WG FEH Transferred to 15th Air Force when became lead Crew    sn# 38266722
S/Sgt   JACK R. DeBORDE        TG FEH flew 10 missions as formation officer.                             sn# 39615579

Missions of S/Sgt Jack Deborde with Lt Raiford Crew/Lead Crew

06 JAN 45      ANNWEILER
10 JAN 45      COLOGNE
14 JAN 45      DERBEN
28 JAN 45      DUISBURG 
03 FEB 45      BERLIN      
06 FEB 45      CHEMNITZ 
21 FEB 45      NURNBURG
24 FEB 45      BREMEN
26 FEB 45      BERLIN
03 MAR 45     BRUNSWICK
10 MAR 45     DORTMUND
11 MAR 45     HAMBURG
14 MAR 45     HANOVER
17 MAR 45     PLAUEN
19 MAR 45     JENA
22 MAR 45     ALHORN
28 MAR 45     HANOVER
31 MAR 45     BAD BERKA
09 APR 45     MUNICH
15 APR 45     ROYAN
17 APR 45     AUSSIG
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MEMO 2:

Capt Eden and Capt Charles "Scotty" Scott flew the entire distance together, from crew assignment to Lt William G. Macnab, pilot, through missions with Lt Charlie "Hong Kong" Wilson, Lt. David Raiford, and Lt Leslie Dawson. On February 24, 1945, Dad writes, "I didn't know the fellows named the ship. We all had several suggestions and since we had 9 men to man her I suggested we paint a big black cat on the ship's side and call it "9 lives." If that is the name the fellows adopted then I'll use it too." On March 15th, he writes, "Yesterday my leather jacket arrived, now I can have it painted up with the usual stuff the fellows put on it: bombs for each mission, a B-17, etc." Dad received his Captain's bars on March 24, 1945 and Scotty his on April 20th. The picture is, unfortunately, undated however all the evidence shows this was made after April 20th, 1945, and, to me, demonstrates their absolute dedication to their crew brothers under Lt Macnab.

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: DATE:  
AIRCRAFT: CAUSE:  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  

PHOTOS:

 Doug Eden, 349th Squadron. Lead Bombardier on the Chowhound missions. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire 

Capt Douglas Eden Graduation photo from Bombardier School.   Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Graduation notice as Bombardier in paper for Capt Douglas Eden. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Air Medal Awarded to Douglan Eden. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Air Medal Award . Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Promotion to 1st Lt  March 6, 1945.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Capt Douglas Eden 350th Squadron Lead Bombardier. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Capt Douglas Eden, 350th Lead Bombardier right and unknown. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire 

Newspaper article of Douglas Eden promotion to Captain. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Douglas Eden on leave in States. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Capt Douglas Eden Luckye Bastardes Club Certificate  for flying 28 missions.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Shadow Box of Capt Douglas Eden. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire 

Collection from 1990's of Chowhound awards, medallions,and patch belonging to Douglas Eden who was greatly involved in these events sponsored in Holland.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

In case of being shot down and landing in Russian Territory>  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

 "August 10, 1945 aboard the victory ship "John Harvard" docked in Boston Harbor. DeBarkation came 15 minutes later, first chance to touch US soil for a long time. Boat sailed from Greenock Scotland." [Standing: Captain Glack or Glock  (?), Chaplain Smith, Capt. Douglas Eden; 
Kneeling: Dick Lawson, Dan Lloyd. Disclaimer on the names...Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Class Book photo of Douglas Eden from Kirtland AAF New Mexico. Courtesy of Beth Eden-Maguire

Class Book of Douglas Eden from Kirtland AAF New Mexico. Courtesy of Beth Eden-Maguire

Last three ties were given too Veterans that Flew the Chowhound Missions. Ties were given at celebrations in Holland to commemorate the events at the end of the War . These ties belong to Capt Douglas Edan , photo courtesy of Beth Eden-Maguire

Capt. Doug Eden (Left) and Capt. Scotty (Charles J. Scott Right) flew the entire distance together, from crew assignment to Lt William G. Macnab, pilot, through missions with Lt Charlie "Hong Kong" Wilson, Lt. David Raiford, and Lt Leslie Dawson (did I miss anyone?). [On February 24, 1945, Dad writes, "I didn't know the fellows named the ship. We all had several suggestions and since we had 9 men to man her I suggested we paint a big black cat on the ship's side and call it "9 lives." If that is the name the fellows adopted then I'll use it too." On March 15th, he writes, "Yesterday my leather jacket arrived, now I can have it painted up with the usual stuff the fellows put on it: bombs for each mission, a B-17, etc." Dad received his Captain's bars on March 24, 1945 and Scotty his on April 20th. The picture is, unfortunately, undated however all the evidence shows this was made after April 20th, 1945, and, to me, demonstrates their absolute dedication to their crew brothers under Lt Macnab.....Photo and info courtesy of Beth Eden-Mcguire. 

 The William MacNab Crew MacNab crew information (100th Photo Archives) 

Newspaper report of the missing in Action of Lt MacNab.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Part V Munich April 9, 1945 Strike Photo from Capt Douglas Eden, showing the 3AD Strike.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

100th A Group Strike Photo for Berlin Mission Feb 3, 1945 from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire
Looks Like WILSON flew the A-Sqdn 975 Z  HS 27  drop photo ship...Jack O'Leary

Part VI Munich April 9, 1945 Strike Photo from Capt Douglas Eden, Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Nice photos of the 10-in-1 rations dropping on Schiphol Air Field, both from Lead Crew ships, 8824 aboard PFF "MIKE" off Hardstand 17 piloted by STAPLES DEPLANQUE CROTTY and leading A-Sqdn 2 May 1945 and WILSON RAIFORD aboard PFF 8916 leading C-Sqdn (I've also got a copy of that "MIKE" drop photo)Jack O'Leary. Photo courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire. 

100th B Group Strike Photo for Berlin Mission Feb 3, 1945 from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire
 WALLISH was flying the B-Sqdn drop photo 613  HS 9

Aussig Marshalling Yards strike photo from 100 "C" Group. Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Part IV:  Munich April 9, 1945 Strike Photo from Capt Douglas Eden, showing the 3AD Strike.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Part II Munich April 9, 1945 Strike Photo from Capt Douglas Eden, Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Part III Munich April 9, 1945 Bombs Away from Capt Douglas Eden.Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Derben Jan 14,1945 100 "A" Group Strike Photo from Capt Douglas Eden, Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

100th "C" Group Strike Photo for Berlin Mission Feb 3, 1945 from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire
Thats Lyman Fillinggame flying LITTLE SWEETHEART---KLEEN SWEEP in the C-Sqdn bomb drop photo 532 G  HS # 15 ... Jack O'Leary

100th "C" Group Strike Photo for BURG-bei-MAGDEBURG, from Capt Douglas Eden.  Photo Courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire

Part I: 100th on way to Munich April 9, 1945.  Lucky Lassie LD-Y, in the lead, GINGER LD-U off left wing, HURRI-CANE LD-X off Right wing.   

Nice photos of the 10-in-1 rations dropping on Schiphol Air Field, both from Lead Crew ships, 8824 aboard PFF "MIKE" off Hardstand 17 piloted by STAPLES DEPLANQUE CROTTY and leading A-Sqdn 2 May 1945 and WILSON RAIFORD aboard PFF 8916 leading C-Sqdn (I've also got a copy of that "MIKE" drop photo)Jack O'Leary. Photo courtesy of Beth Eden-McGuire.

 

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Crew 1

ID: 1451