Database Search

You are in the database section of the website.

Select a record category from RECORDS above. When you have selected a category, you will see search options for that category above the record list. 

Most fields require at least three characters. When you submit your query, the search engine will return all records that contain your search term.

Note that when searching for an aircraft serial number, you must enter the full serial number without the leading "4" and without a dash in the Aircraft SN search field. For example, you would enter 42-37772 as 237772.

The Personnel name field searches both last and first names, so if you enter the search term, "Russ", the search engine will return both Russell Abel and James Russell.

You narrow the search by entering more characters into the search field. For example, "Russ" returns many hits. "Russell" returns fewer hits. The same principle applies to all queries.

The POW and KIA categories are list only and are not searchable.

MACR PILOT: 2Lt  Jack  Hunter  - O-753891

MACR: 04866 FICHE : 01736

ORGANIZATION

LOCATION: AAF Station #139 COMMAND: VIII AF GROUP: 100th Bomb Gp (H) AAF
SQUADRON: 351st BS DETACHMENT:  
     

DETAIL

DEPARTURE:AAF Station #139 INITIAL COURSE: SSE  
INTENDED DESTINATION: Liege M/Y    
MISSION TYPE:Operational    

WEATHER & VISIBILITY AT TIME OF LAST REPORT

CONDITION: CAVU    

GIVE

DATE: 1944-05-11 TIME: 19:31 LOCATION: Missing

SPECIFY:

Last Sighted

CONFIRMED OR BELIEVED REASON FOR LOSS

LOSS DUE TO : Enemy anti-aircraft

OTHER REASON FOR LOSS:

AIRCRAFT: 42-39983

TYPE: B-17 SERIES: G  
     
     

ENGINES:

MODEL: R-1820-97    
A: 42-39983
B: SW-005535
C: SWE-127
D: SW-18
   

INSTALLED WEAPONS:

A: 93419
B: 931042
C: 667339
D: 666736
E: 051056
F: 931361
G: 667009
H: 931473
I: 931051
J: 666228
K: 667033
L: 931365 (m) 66284

PERSONS BELOW ARE LISTED AS:

CASUALTY TYPE: Battle casualty  
NUMBER OF PERSONS ON BOARD:    
CREW: 10 PASS: 0 TOTAL: 10

PERSONNEL:

POSITION NAME RANK SERIAL
P1
P2 Jack  Hunter 2Lt O-753891
CP George W. Shoesmith 2Lt O-815250
NAV (N) Richard J. Heh 2Lt O-814310
BOM (B) Murray J. Lirette 2Lt O-767531
RAD Spiro Lecouras TSgt 13118174
ENG Arthur L. Wellingham TSgt 39037669
BAL Charles L, Anglin SSgt 06955639
WG (W) Robert H. Kuehl SSgt 39325840
WG (W) John Rupnick SSgt 13132363
TG (T) Herbert S. South SSgt 15113580

PERSONS WHO ARE BELIEVED TO HAVE LAST KNOWLEDGE OF AIRCRAFT

Delbert S. Pearson 1Lt Missing
Last sighted
Edgar W. Wolf 2Lt Missing
Last sighted    
Carrol W. Woldt 2Lt Missing

PERSONNEL WHO ARE BELIEVED TO HAVE SURVIVED

REASON: Parachutes were used OTHER:  

EYEWITNESS DESCRIPTIONS OF CRASH

Report:
"A/C #983 received a direct hit from flak in a wing at #1 engine a few seconds after bombs away. A/C went down in a flaming spin and hit near the marshalling yards and exploded. 2 chutes were seen."
   
   
Second Witness: No Data  
Report:

DESCRIPTION OF SEARCH EFFORT

DETAIL:No search made.

PREPARING OFFICER

PREPARED BY: WALTER G. BURKE 1st Lt. Air Corps Assistant Adjutant

DATE PREPARED: 1944-05-14

TRANSCRIBER NOTES


REPORT:

on 5/4/44. On 11/5/44,S/Sgts Charley L.Anglin,BT and John Rupnick,RW,were flying in place of Martiello & Medhurst and both were KIA. Both Anglin & Rupnick were listed  on the crew of R.V.E. Monrad on 8/3/44.Rupnick was originally on the M.E.Beatty crew when it  joined the 100th on 6/9/43. Immediately after bombs were released,A/C received a direct flak hit in wing at #1 engine. Part of wing blown off & A/C went down in flaming spin. Heh,Lirette and South were blown out of A/C. South suffered a compound fracture of a leg when blown from a/c.

Captured

On November 10, 1944, the crew went through the rigors of a mission day. The weather was cloudy and cold as they headed for their airfield target near Wiesbaden. "We had a new Squadron Commander on that bomb run," Ivan said. "Our plane was flying Tail End Charlie, the back side of the formation. I'm not really sure what happened. I think the commander broke away and left the group. The flak was pretty dense, lots of 88s and 105s (88 and 105 millimeter anti-aircraft guns). With radar jamming we could usually keep the explosions below us, or at least stay between the range of their shelling. This day it was different.

Suddenly there was and explosion on board. Shrapnel had splattered into the fuselage and over the wings. One engine was immediately knocked out and the crew would soon discover Navigator James Goss was dead.

"I could reach back from my position and stick my fist through a hole in the plane. We began to fall back from the squadron and the Bombardier (trained as a Navigator) was trying to find us a place to go."

During that time, the crew became aware that two more of the engines were on fire and had limited time left. "We were about 18 to 20 thousand feet when the fire broke. We had some time to sort things out and finally the pilot called to abandon ship. From the time we got hit we had been discarding as much as possible. It wouldn't work. I left my position and crawled the 15 feet from the tail to the exit door, picked up my parachute and shoes, threw the shoes over my shoulder, buckled up and dived out."

Ivan fell quite a distance before deploying his chute. When he did he noticed that nosy fighter pilot was circling him.

"It sounded like a Maytag," he chuckled. "It was very quite there and all I could hear was the plane circling."

As he came closer to the ground he had to make two adjustments with his chute. He slipped his chute, a process of letting out air to control direction, to first avoid a barn and then to maneuver away from a railroad embankment where there were power lines. He finally landed in a boggy pasture and German guards were waiting there to take him away.